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Key witness: Martin said 'get off, get off'

NEED TO KNOW
  • HLN is covering the George Zimmerman trial live, gavel to gavel
  • Zimmerman is charged with second-degree murder for killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin on February 26, 2012
Key witness: Martin said 'get off, get off'

In a sometimes contentious cross-examination filled with testy exchanges, defense attorney Don West peppered the prosecution’s star witness, Rachel Jeantel, with questions Thursday about the consistency of her statements related to the night Trayvon Martin died.

At one point, West even asked Jeantel if she understood English.

"I don't understand you, I do understand English," Jeantel replied.

"When someone speaks to you in English, do you believe you have any difficulty understanding it because it wasn't your first language?" asked West.

"I understand English really well," said Jeantel.

The 19-year-old, who had been asked several times during her testimony to speak louder or more clearly, said Creole is her first language. Phone records show that Jeantel was talking to Martin moments before he was shot to death by George Zimmerman last year.

Zimmerman, a former neighborhood watch captain, is charged with second-degree murder for killing 17-year-old Martin in Sanford, Florida, on Feb. 26, 2012. Zimmerman told police he was pursuing the teenager because there had been a rash of crime in the area. A confrontation ensued, and Zimmerman said he was forced to kill Martin in self-defense.

On Thursday, her second day on the stand, Jeantel offered terse replies when asked by the defense about her claims that Martin told her the night he died that someone was following him and that a fight followed.

"Trayvon got hit," said Jeantel.

"You don't know that, do you?" West shot back.

"No sir," said Jeantel.

"You don't know if Trayvon got hit, do you?" asked West.

"No sir," said Jeantel.

"You don't know that Trayvon didn't, at that moment, take his fist and drive it into George Zimmerman's face, do you?"

"No sir," said Jeantel. West also challenged Jeantel several times over whether Zimmerman approached Martin the night of the shooting, but she maintained her story.

"If he was going to confront the man he would have told me, ‘I am about to confront the man and see what he wants.’ He did not tell me that, sir. He just told me he tried to get home, sir. But the man was still following him, sir," said Jeantel.

Jurors also heard the 911 call made by neighbor Jenna Lauer that captured the sounds of yelling and the gunshot that killed Martin.

Lauer testified that she muted her TV after hearing voices take part in what she describes as a “three-part exchange.” She couldn’t identify what exactly was being said.

After hearing the voices, Lauer said she heard another sound.

Read more: Rachel Jeantel's letter to Trayvon Martin's mother (pdf)

“I just heard whoever was out there scuffling around... it sounded like sneakers on pavement and grass," said Lauer. "Like someone was running on the pavement and on the grass -- it sounded like that."

The scuffling turned to yelps, which then turned into cries for “help,” according to Lauer.

"It sounded like they were in our living room -- it was right there," said Lauer. "It just sounded like they were desperate and whoever it was really needed help or wanted help.”

Another neighbor, Selma Mora, said she walked out her back door after hearing the gunshot, which she at first thought was a skateboard smacking the pavement.

"One of them was on the ground and the other one was on top in a position like a rider," said Mora, who testified with the help of a court translator.

"Like riding a horse?" asked prosecutor John Guy.

"Yes," said Mora.

"With one leg on either side?" asked Guy.

"Yes," said Mora.

Mora said she asked the pair, "What's going on?" three times before the one on top told her to call police. She said he then got up and paced back and forth between the body and the trashcans with one hand on his waist and the other on his head.

"Well if I remember correctly, he was acting like, in a concerned manner. Well really in a way like, 'What just happened?' Confused," said Mora.

Defense attorney Mark O’Mara asked Mora to reenact the moment she heard the gunshot. He even suggested she slip off her high heels, which she did.

Mora then re-enacted the scene for jurors, showing them how she was at the kitchen window, then slid out the partially open sliding glass doors and leaned around the column on her porch to look at the scene.

Mora was never able to identify the man on top or the man on bottom.

"Like I said from the beginning, it was so dark that what little light there was would not allow you to determine the details," she said.

Testimony in Zimmerman’s trial will pick back up Friday morning at 9 a.m. ET.

HLN is live-blogging Zimmerman's trial. Click here for HLN's live blog of Wednesday's proceedings. Read below for minute-by-minute updates:

5:41 p.m. ET: The judge has recessed court for the day. Testimony will resume at 9 a.m. ET on Friday.

5:40 p.m. ET: Mora says she doesn't feel capable of putting thoughts into the man's head. Prosecutor Guy goes over photos of the neighborhood with her pointing out the columns and bushes that look similar to what's behind her home.

5:38 p.m. ET: Mora says she couldn't see the man good enough to see blood on his nose or on the back of his head.

"Like I said from the beginning, it was so dark that what little light there was, would not allow you to determine the details," said Mora.

O'Mara has finished his cross-examination.

5:36 p.m. ET: O'Mara demonstrates the hand position for Mora, asking her if this is how the man acted. She confirms that yes, he was doing that back and forth between the body and trash cans.

5:34 p.m. ET: O'Mara approaches Mora with a transcript from her deposition and asks if it refreshes her collection about how the man was acting.

"Well if I remember correctly... he was acting like, in a concerned manner. Well really in a way like, 'What just happened?' Confused," said Mora.

She also says he could probably use a lot of words to describe how he seemed.

5:30 p.m. ET: The person on top asked her to call police and walked to the trash cans and then returned to the body, according to Mora. The person on top paced two or three times before a person with a flashlight showed up.

O'Mara asks her about how the person had a hand on his head and what that looked like to her. At first, she said it's not for her to say. Then she answers.

"I would assume in a position like a person who is concerned," said Mora.

5:27 p.m. ET: Mora says the person on top was on his knees, bending over as if he was supporting himself using the person on the bottom.

5:24 p.m. ET: O'Mara has Mora walk through what she did in real time, which she does, showing how she left the kitchen, slid through the partially open glass door and peered around the column, looking to her right.

5:21 p.m. ET: O'Mara asks Mora to demonstrate what she did in the kitchen after hearing the sound, how she went through the sliding glass door and how she looked outside. He tells her she can take off her high heels, which she does. Mora begins demonstrating for jurors where everything is located.

5:18 p.m. ET: Mora says she didn't realize the sound she heard -- a child's skateboard slapping on cement -- was the gunshot. Kids normally play in that area so she says it made more sense that the sound was from kids playing.

5:16 p.m. ET: O'Mara asks Mora if she heard herself on the 911 call, telling her neighbor to go back inside her house. Mora says she wasn't really listening for that and it depends on which 911 call you're listening to.

5:14 p.m. ET: Mora demonstrates on the map where she heard the cries. She says she only heard two and that they could be some of the screams heard on the 911 call.

5:11 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'Mara has Mora confirm where her coffee maker was in relation to her kitchen window. She says she was making coffee at the time when she heard the cries.

5:09 p.m. ET: Mora didn't know Martin or Zimmerman. Prosecutor Guy has wrapped up his direct examination.

5:08 p.m. ET: When Mora went back inside, her friend Mary was on the phone with 911. Mora says she didn't speak to Sanford Police that night but spoke to them about four days later.

5:06 p.m. ET: Once the person on top had gotten up, see could see the person on the bottom, who was face-down, according to Mora. Her friend then tells her it was a gunshot that she heard earlier. Another female neighbor is coming out of her house and Mora says she tells the woman it was a shooting and to go back inside.

5:02 p.m. ET: The man on top got up and took a few steps from the body, according to Mora. She says that while he was pacing, he had one hand on his waist and the other on his head. He didn't seem to have trouble walking and he didn't say anything.

5:00 p.m. ET: Mora says she couldn't make out the race of the person on top or the color of their clothes. She couldn't tell if the person on the bottom was a man or woman. She said to the individuals, "What's going on?" Nobody answered her but the person on top looked around at her. She asked again, "What's going on?" and the person didn't answer. She asked it again and finally got an answer. The person on top said just "to call the police." The person on the bottom never said anything.

4:55 p.m. ET: Mora didn't hear anymore crying when she went out on her porch. She describes the position of the people she saw.

"One of them was on the ground and the other one was on top in a position like a rider," said Mora.

"Like riding a horse?" asked prosecutor John Guy.

"Yes," said Mora.

"With one leg on either side?" asked Guy.

"Yes," said Mora.

She also says the person on top was facing the trash receptacle.

4:51 p.m. ET: Mora's porch has a screen, which goes halfway up, to keep her daughter's dog from getting out. She wouldn't have gone outside if she thought the sound was a gunshot. The sounds were coming from her right. When she looked in that direction, she says she saw two people.

4:48 p.m. ET: It was too dark for Mora to see anything when she looked out the window. Then she heard another sound, which didn't seem like a gunshot.

"It was like a dry sound, which I have described like the thump of a child falling, is what I have called it," said Mora.

4:46 p.m. ET: Mora was in her kitchen, with the window open half-way, when she heard a "crying" sound. The kitchen is located at the back of the house. It was a soft cry and she couldn't make out any words.

4:44 p.m. ET: Mora says she was home with her friend, Mary, the night Martin was shot. Their children were not there. The weather was rainy and dark that evening.

4:42 p.m. ET: Mora was living in Zimmerman's neighborhood at the time of the shooting. She lived with her two children and a friend. Her children were nine and 14 at the time. Her friend's daughter was eight at the time.

4:40 p.m. ET: The prosecution has called a new witness, Selma Mora, who speaks Spanish and will be speaking through the court translator. The judge tells jurors to not use any Spanish skills they have and listen only to the interpreter. Mora sells equipment for construction work. She is a U.S. citizen, originally from Columbia, who has lived in the United States for 12 years.

4:35 p.m. ET: The judge is back on the bench and the jury is being seated.

4:19 p.m. ET: The judge has recessed the court for about 10 minutes to give the attorneys a break.

4:18 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'Mara asks Lauer to tell the court how many tweets she has sent out. She says zero, according to her profile.

"I don't know how to use this," said Lauer.

She says that according to her Twitter account, Zimmerman's brother is following her, not the other way around.

Lauer has been excused and told not to discuss her testimony with anyone.

4:16 p.m. ET: The prosecutor is showing Lauer her Twitter page. She says she hardly knows how to use Twitter but sees that she's following Zimmerman's brother. She says she's been careful to stay out of the media and not pick sides, so she may have accidentally followed him.

4:10 p.m. ET: The prosecutor asks Lauer if she has followed Zimmerman's brother on Twitter or Facebook. She says she doesn't think she has. The attorneys are at a sidebar.

4:08 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'Mara asks if she knew that the restraining order incident was mutual and eventually dropped. She says she didn't know it was dropped. She also didn't know the battery charge was dropped to a misdemeanor.

4:07 p.m. ET: Prosecutor de la Rionda asks Lauer about her comments that Zimmerman wasn't a hothead and never seemed angry or upset. He asks her if she knew about a restraining order against Zimmerman by a girlfriend that he beat up. Defense attorney O'Mara says this is a mischaracterization.

The prosecutor then asks if Lauer knows about a prior incident where Zimmerman's girlfriend at the time took out a restraining order against him for violence against her.

She says she was aware of the restraining order. She also knew Zimmerman was arrested for battery on an officer at a bar. She says she heard it on the news.

4:03 p.m. ET: The judge has dismissed the jury to take up a matter outside of their presence.

3:59 p.m. ET: Lauer says she couldn't see anything and couldn't say who was yelling for help. The attorneys are at a sidebar.

3:56 p.m. ET: Lauer says her husband never went out to help because he couldn't find the knife.

"He never did find a knife because he doesn’t know where they’re at," she said as several people in the courtroom laughed. O'Mara tells her this is being broadcast on TV and she just embarrassed her husband publicly (more laughing). O'Mara has finished this questions.

3:53 p.m. ET: Zimmerman didn't seem angry or hot-headed, according to Lauer. She thought his involvement with neighborhood watch was to help further benefit the community, not that he was a vigilante.

3:52 p.m. ET: "Did you consider the screams to be life-threatening screams?" asked O'Mara.

"Yes," said Lauer.

He holds up the bloody photo of Zimmerman taken by an officer and asks if the screams could be coming from someone having that done to him. She says yes, it's possible.

The prosecution objected when O'Mara held up a bloody photo of the back of Zimmerman's head. 

3:50 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'Mara is going over the map with Lauer, asking her where street signs were located. She says that a bush would sometimes obstruct the address numbers on her home.

3:47 p.m. ET: Lauer isn't sure if the "I have a gun, take my gun" comment was made to a police officer. When an officer asked her to identify the man who was the shooter, she said she didn't want to go up to him so the officer took a picture on his phone and brought it to her.

"I said I didn't know who it was," said Lauer. "He didn't look the same, I just didn't recognize him."

3:42 p.m. ET: "It just sounded like they were desperate and whoever it was really needed help or wanted help," said Lauer. "The yells for help – the voice was the same the whole time."

Lauer says she didn't hear, "You're going to die mother [expletive]" -- she's not saying it wasn't said.

3:40 p.m. ET: Lauer says she could hear the yelps and helps better in person than someone listening to the recording.

"It sounded like they were in our living room -- it was right there," said Lauer.

3:38 p.m. ET: The three-part exchange turned to scuffling, which turned to yelps, which then turned to helps, according to Lauer. She thinks there were a couple of yelps before she connected with 911.

3:36 p.m. ET: O'Mara brings a map to the witness stand and has Lauer point out where the couch, love seat and TV were located in her home. She says she first heard the noise at the T-intersection behind her home. It was a three-part exchange. She never heard anything like, "What're you following me for?" or "What're you talking about?"

3:33 p.m. ET: Lauer says again that the yelling stopped after the gunshot. The prosecutor has finished his direct examination and now defense attorney O'Mara has started his questions.

3:32 p.m. ET: Lauer says she was a board member of the Home Owner's Association. She says Zimmerman came to a few of the meetings and she knew him by sight. She knew the neighborhood watch program was starting up and that he was involved. She couldn't identify the yelling voice as Zimmerman's because she had never heard him yell like that in their meetings.

3:30 p.m. ET: Prosecutor de la Rionda is going over an aerial view of the neighborhood, pointing out the entrance and the different roads.

3:27 p.m. ET: Lauer and de la Rionda are going over more photos, this time images taken in the light, pointing out where Lauer's home was located.

3:23 p.m. ET: Prosecutor de la Rionda is having Lauer point out on a map where her house is located. He also shows her a picture of the lighting conditions that night -- she says it was darker than the photo, which looks lighted. He's also showing her other photos from that night, pointing out where her house is located.

3:20 p.m. ET: Lauer says she heard someone say at one point, "I have a gun, take my gun." It was said in a matter-of-fact way and she didn't hear a response. Martin's mother, Sybrina Fulton, has returned to the courtroom now that the 911 call has finished playing.

3:19 p.m. ET: Lauer says she never heard anyone say, "You're going to die tonight mother [expletive]." She believes she heard nothing else but "help" and "help me."

3:17 p.m. ET: You can listen to part of her 911 call here.

3:15 p.m. ET: The prosecutor is now playing Lauer's 911 call in court. "I can't see him, I don't want to go out there, I don't know what's going on," she said on the call. You can hear yelling in the background.

3:13 p.m. ET: Lauer says she heard her next door neighbor, John Good, open his door at one point. He doesn't have a screened porch, it's just open.

"He said something along the lines of, 'What the hell are you doing?'" said Lauer. "The yelling for help continued."

3:11 p.m. ET: "The 'yelps' turned to 'helps,'" said Lauer. "It was one person yelling help. It just sounded like the same voice the entire time. It was a man." She's not sure if there were scuffling noises at the time. The yelling for help stopped after the gunshot.

3:09 p.m. ET: Lauer says she went into the kitchen to stop her husband from getting involved and that's when she heard the gunshot. The phone was at Lauer's ear the entire time, she never went closer to the door and put the phone out to let the operator hear what's going on.

3:07 p.m. ET: "I didn't want them to hear me snitching on them and calling the police," said Lauer. She wasn't sure if it was just kids so she had moved away from the glass doors.

Her husband was in the kitchen, maybe getting a knife to help.

"He was going to get something and maybe go around the front and see, but... that didn't happen," said Lauer.

3:05 p.m. ET: "We decided to call 911 as soon as we heard the scuffling noises," said Lauer. From the time she muted the TV until the time 911 picked up her call, she says it took about 30 seconds. Her husband tried to call first but his phone locked up on him.

"At the point where I’m dialing 911, it’s what I describe as 'yelps' -- it wasn’t actual words that I could make out yet," said Lauer.

3:02 p.m. ET: The second round of noises occurred immediately after she muted the TV. "After the scuffling it gradually went into like a grunting noise," said Lauer. "It sounded more like if two people were rolling around. At first it sounded like maybe people were rolling around... after that it sounded like wrestling. At one point I thought they were going to come through the screen." She says she is basing everything on what she heard since she didn't see anything.

3:00 p.m. ET: "I keep calling it like a three-part exchange. One person said something, then another and then another," said Lauer. She describes the tone as flustered. "I muted the TV as soon as I heard the voices," she said.

"Immediately after... I just heard whoever was out there scuffling around... it sounded like sneakers on pavement and grass," said Lauer. "Like someone was running on the pavement and on the grass -- it sounded like that."

2:57 p.m. ET: "I just heard voices," said Lauer. She says she could tell the voices were outside in the backyard but she couldn't make out any words. She could tell the voices were coming from the left of where she was sitting. "It just sounded like loud talking," she said. She couldn't tell how many people there were.

2:55 p.m. ET: Lauer was watching TV with her husband the night Martin was shot. She was on the loveseat, which faced the sliding glass doors. She describes the volume on the TV as "pretty loud." She also says it was raining and her sliding glass door was open. Her view of the backyard at night is obstructed by the blinds.

2:52 p.m. ET: Lauer is describing the layout of her home. She says she had bamboo blinds that covered the majority of her screened porch. They were closed on the night Martin was shot.

2:50 p.m. ET: The prosecution has called Jenna Lauer to the stand. She lived in Zimmerman's neighborhood when the shooting occurred and made the 911 call on which the screams for help were captured.

2:47 p.m. ET: MacDonald tells prosecutors that a more detailed record has to be requested within six months of the calls, otherwise it's not available. This witness has been excused.

2:46 p.m. ET: Defense attorney Mark O'Mara is now questioning MacDonald. He's asking him again about how a call to voicemail looks like an outgoing call. The connection time on these calls is the length of the voicemail, according to MacDonald. O'Mara hs finished his questions.

2:42 p.m. ET: Prosecutor Mantei is going over specific calls made on February 26, 2012. MacDonald points out a call that looks to be outgoing, but really it's an unanswered call being sent to voicemail. Every call made after 7:12 p.m. ET that night goes straight to voicemail, according to MacDonald. The prosecutor has finished his direct examination.

2:37 p.m. ET: There has to be some sort of connection for a call to register, according to MacDonald. If the call is only a few seconds, MacDonald says it rounds up to the minute. Prosecutor Richard Mantei points out a call made at 7:08 p.m. ET for five minutes and a call made at 7:18 p.m. ET that lasts for one minute.

2:34 p.m. ET: Text messages are date-stamped with Pacific time, according to MacDonald.

2:33 p.m. ET: MacDonald is describing which calls are incoming vs. outgoing, which ones are text messages, which ones are mobile-to-mobile and how long the calls have lasted.

2:30 p.m. ET: MacDonald is describing how phone records are created. He's also looking at records being displayed on the projector in the courtroom.

2:28 p.m. ET: The prosecutor has called Raymond MacDonald, a senior manager at T-Mobile.

2:26 p.m. ET: The jury is being seated.

2:22 p.m. ET: The judge has dismissed Jeantel, telling her she is allowed to go home but that she may have to come back and arrangements will be made for her return at that time.

"Can I use my phone?" asked Jeantel.

"As soon as you're out of the courtroom you can," said Judge Debra Nelson.

2:19 p.m. ET: The judge has dismissed jurors for a few minutes so attorneys can take up a matter outside their presence. The attorneys are at a sidebar.

2:15 p.m. ET: The defense wants Jeantel to remain available for more questions. The attorneys are at a sidebar.

2:14 p.m. ET: Jeantel says people in her culture use the N-word and "cracker" often.

"Trayvon referred to white people as crackers, correct?" asked West.

"I don’t recall, sir," said Jeantel after a long pause. West has finished his questions for today.

2:11 p.m. ET: "Are you claiming in any way that you don't understand English?" asked West.

"I don't understand you, I do understand English," said Jeantel.

"When someone speaks to you in English, do you believe you have any difficulty understanding it because it wasn't your first language?" asked West.

"I understand English really well," said Jeantel.

She said Creole was her first language and that her mother doesn't understand English very well.

2:09 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she remembers using the word "bump" in reference to Martin. She agrees that the phone records have the most accurate depiction of the number and length of the phone calls she made with Martin the day he was shot. The prosecutor has finished his re-direct examination.

2:07 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she remembers when defense attorney West asked her about Martin's description of Zimmerman as a "creepy [expletive] cracker."

"Is that the way people speak in your culture, in your age group?" asked de la Rionda.

"Yes, sir," said Jeantel.

2:05 p.m. ET: The prosecutor is talking to Jeantel about a time when he picked her up and took a statement from her.

"You were pretty emotional at that statement weren’t you?" asked de la Rionda.

"Yes, sir," said Jeantel.

"Was it hard for you to talk about this?" asked de la Rionda.

"Yes, sir," said Jeantel.

2:03 p.m. ET: The prosecutor asks Jeantel if a friend wrote her letter to Martin's mom. She says yes.

"You can’t write in cursive, correct?" asked de la Rionda.

"Yes, sir," said Jeantel.

"You also can’t read in cursive?" asked de la Rionda.

"Yes, sir," said Jeantel.

2:01 p.m. ET: Prosecutor de la Rionda begins by making a joke about her referring to him as the bald guy. He's now discussing her Haitian background and whether she learned English or Creole first.

"Creole and Spanish," said Jeantel.

1:59 p.m. ET: Jeantel says that after listening to the recording, the told prosecutor de la Rionda "You want that too?" Defense attorney West has finished his cross-examination.

1:58 p.m. ET: The judge has said that if Jeantel's answer is consistent, West doesn't get to play the recording.

1:55 p.m. ET: The jury is now being seated.

1:52p.m. ET: Defense attorney West is playing an audio recording of an interview with Jeantel. He wants it played for the jury.

1:46 p.m. ET: The judge is back on the bench.

12:44 p.m. ET: Judge Nelson has recessed court for lunch. The live blog will pick back up when court resumes at 1:45 p.m. ET.

12:38 p.m. ET: The attorneys are now at a sidebar with the judge.

12:34 p.m. ET: The attorneys are reviewing the transcripts.

12:32 p.m. ET: The attorneys are arguing over which transcript should be used for this line of questioning.

12:29 p.m. ET: West is asking Jeantel if de la Rionda asked her if Martin ever said the man got out of the car to which she responded "You want that too?"

Jeantel said she does not remember. West is about to play that portion of the interview for the jury.

12:26 p.m. ET: West is reviewing his materials.

12:23 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

12:20 p.m. ET: "If he was going to confront the man he would of told me I am about to confront the man and see what he wants. He did not tell me that, sir. He just told me he tried to get home, sir. But the man was still following him, sir," said Jeantel.

12:18 p.m. ET: Jeantel she heard a "bump" over the phone, when describing the sound someone getting hit.

12:15 p.m. ET:

West asked, "You don't know whether the man was approaching Trayvon at that point and getting closer or whether Trayvon was approaching the man and getting closer?"

"Trayvon would have told me he would call me back, sir. If he were was going to approach him, sir," said Jeantel.

12:12 p.m. ET: West is asking Jeantel about wind noises she heard over the phone. She said the wind made her think he was running or walking at that point.

12:08 p.m. ET: West wants to Jeantel to guess how much time passed from the noise that sounded like to the noise that sounded like people rolling in the grass. Jeantel said, "I don't know, sir."

12:05 p.m. ET: De La Rionda has made multiple objections to West's questions as being repetitive.

12:01 p.m. ET: West asked Jeantel how much time past from the moment she heard someone get hit, and the noise that sounded like people were rolling around in the wet grass. Jeantel said she did not know how much time pasted between those two moments.

11:58 a.m. ET: Jeantel said she thought she could hear people rolling around on wet grass.

11:55 a.m. ET: West play another part of the recording of the interview for the jurors. On the recording, Jeantel said the last thing she heard was the sound of someone getting hit.

11:51 a.m. ET: West is going to play the recording of Jeantel's interview with De La Rionda. It is not clear what she was saying on the recording, because it sounded like at one point she said she couldn't hear Martin.

Jeantel told West she could hear Martin that it was Martin.

11:47 a.m. ET: There seems to be a delay with bringing the jury into the courtroom.

11:44 a.m. ET: The jury is being seated.

11:34 a.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

1:33 a.m. ET: West played the recording for the judge. The recording is difficult to understand, and Jeantel told the attorneys she said on the recording that she could hear Martin say "get off."

11:29 a.m. ET: Nelson said she is going to send the juror out of the courtroom briefly.

11:24 a.m. ET: West know wants to play a recording of Jeantel's interview with De La Rionda for the jury so they can decide if she said she "could" have heard Martin say "get off, off." Judge Nelson has asked West to enter the recording into evidence. The attorneys are now at a sidebar with the judge.

11:21 a.m. ET: Jeantel said heard Martin say "get off, get off." West is trying to point out that a transcript of an interview with prosecutors said she "could" have heard Martin say "get off, get off."

11:17 a.m. ET: West is showing Jeantel a transcript, and she is reviewing it.

11:14 a.m. ET: West asked Jeantel if she heard a noise that sounded like someone was being hit.

"Trayvon got hit," said Jeantel.

West shot back, "You don't know that do you?"

"No sir," said Jeantel.

West asked, "You don't know if Trayvon got hit, do you?"

"No sir," said Jeantel.

West asked, "You don't know that Trayvon didn't at that moment take his fist and drive it into George Zimmerman's face, do you?"

"No sir," said Jeantel.

11:09 a.m. ET: Jeantel said after Martin ran for a little bit, Zimmerman caught up to him and Martin asked him why he was "following him for". Zimmerman replied "what are you doing around here?"

11:06 a.m. ET: West is displaying an aerial photo of the Retreat at Twin Lakes for the jury. Jeantel said she does not recognize the picture, and does not know the lay out of Zimmerman's neighborhood.

11:03 a.m. ET: West is about to continue with his cross-examination of Jeantel .

11:02 a.m. ET: Judge Nelson is explaining to the jurors what it means when an attorney makes an objection.

10:58 a.m. ET: The judge is on the bench and the attorneys have joined her for a sidebar.

10:35 a.m. ET: Court is now in a 15 minute recess.

10:34 a.m. ET: West is having Jeantel review her phone records the night of the shooting. She confirms that they are an accurate representation of the phone calls she made on February 26, 2012.

10:31 a.m. ET: West is repeatedly asking Jeantel about whether she knows what direction Martin was heading when he was running. She said did not know his direction multiple times.

10:29 a.m. ET: Jeantel said she knows Martin began to run from Zimmerman at some point, because she could her wind in the phone.

10:26 a.m. ET: Zimmerman is paying close attention to Jeantel's testimony as she explains Martin's last moments alive.

10:23 a.m. ET: West is going over Jeantel's entire recollection of the moments before Martin died one more time. Jeantel seems to be frustrated, and is looking down and closing her eyes.

10:20 a.m. ET: West is asking Jeantel about how throughout the course of February 26 several of her phone calls with Martin dropped due to a bad cell phone signal. Jeantel said multiple calls with Martin that day dropped.

10:17 a.m. ET: Jeantel said two weeks ago at the Florida Department Law Enforcement office in Miami she got the chance to listen to a recording of her interview with law enforcement on April 2, 2012.

10:14 a.m. ET: West is going over all the different opportunities Jeantel had to mention "get off, get off," but choose not to bring it up.

10:10 a.m. ET: West is grilling Jeantel about why she did not mentioned hearing Martin say "get off, get off," in the past.

10:07 a.m. ET: West is asking Jeantel why she did not tell Fulton that she heard Martin tell Zimmerman to get off of him. Jeantel said Fulton did not ask her about her about that.

10:04 a.m. ET: West asked a question Jeantel didn't understand, and the judge told him to break it down so she can understand.

10:01 a.m. ET: Jeantel said Fulton teared up during her April 2, 2012 interview with law enforcement, when she recounted what happened to Martin.

9:58 a.m. ET: West asked, "You were very sensitive to Ms. Fulton's feelings, when you answered Mr. De La Rionda's questions?"

Jeantel answered, "Yes sir."

West asked, "And that is why for example, that you cleaned up some of the language Trayvon Martine used?"

Jeantel answered, "Yes sir."

9:55 a.m. ET: West keeps asking Jeantel to tell him who was in the room during her interview with law enforcement on April 2, 2012.

9:53 a.m. ET: Jeantel is mumbling, so judge Nelson has asked to her to speak up and to speak into the microphone.

9:51 a.m. ET: West told Jeantel if he is harsh with his tone it is not, because he is accusing her of doing something wrong.

9:49 a.m. ET: West is grilling Jeantel about how her conversation with law enforcement was conducted on April 2, 2012.

9:46 a.m. ET: One of the Martin family attorneys was present for the April 2, 2012 interview as well.

9:45 a.m. ET: Prosecutor Bernie De La Rionda, FDLE agents, and Martin's mother were present for Jeantel's interview on April 2, 2012.

9:43 a.m. ET: On April 2, 2012, Jeantel gave her first interview with law enforcement. She was under oath and the conversation was recorded.

9:40 a.m. ET: Jeantel is explaining how she spoke with an ABC reporter in March 2012 and Martin.

9:36 a.m. ET: West is asking Jeantel how the police eventually got in touch with her after the shooting. Jeantel said she did not approach the police.

9:33 a.m. ET: West is asking why Jeantel didn't tell him in a previous interview that Martin told her a "creepy [expletive] cracker" was following him. Jeantel corrected West and said she did say creepy, but did not mention "cracker." West admitted that she did say "creepy."

9:29 a.m. ET: "He described a person, a person that was watching him and following him and that was kind of strange," said Jeantel.

9:26 a.m. ET: Jeantel said she thought it was racially charged, because Zimmerman was chasing him in the rain.

9:24 a.m. ET: Jeantel said Crump asked her if she thought the shooting was a racial thing, and she replied that she thought it was.

9:21 a.m ET: "Then he said the man didn't follow him again. Then he looked back and saw the man again. The man started getting closer, and Trayvon turned around and said 'why are you following me.' Then I heard him fall, and then the phone hung up. I called back and texted, but no response. In my mind, I thought it was just a fight. Then I found out this tragic story. Thank you, Diamond Eugene," said West reading the rest of Jeantel's letter.

9:17 a.m. ET: "I was on the phone when Trayvon decided to go to the corner store. It started to rain so he decided to walk through another complex, because it was raining too hard. He started walking, and then noticed someone was following him, and he decided to find a shortcut," said West reading Jeantel's letter to Martin's mother.

9:14 a.m. ET: Jeantel said she signed the letter with her nickname and her mother's last name so she didn't use her own name. West is now reading the letter aloud for the jury.

9:12 a.m. ET: West asked Jeantel if she can read the letter, and she said she can't because she can't read cursive.

9:11 a.m. ET: Jeantel said she wrote the letter with a friend for Sybrina Fulton, Martin's mother.

9:09 a.m. ET: The prosecution is objecting to a letter Jeantel wrote being entered into evidence. The attorneys are now at a sidebar.

9:08 a.m. ET: West is going back over the fact that Jeantel lied about going to the hospital to see Martin's body.

9:05 a.m. ET: Defense attorney West is asking Jeantel about a conversation she had with the Martin family attorney Ben Crump. West said the first time she was asked by Crump what she heard over the phone she said, "What are you talking about?" Jeantel agreed that according to the transcript she did say, "What are you talking about?"

9:01 a.m. ET: Jeantel is back on the witness stand, and the jury is being seated.

8:30 a.m. ET: Testimony should pick back up at 9:00 a.m ET.

Rachel Jeantel, Trayvon Martin's friend and last person to speak with him on the phone, is back on the stand again today. Her testimony could play a huge role in determining George Zimmerman's fate.

Zimmerman, a former neighborhood watch captain, is charged with second-degree murder for killing 17-year-old Martin in Sanford, Florida, on February 26, 2012. Zimmerman told police he was pursuing the teenager because there had been a rash of crime in the area. A confrontation ensued, and Zimmerman said he was forced to kill Martin in self-defense.

Phone records show Jeantel was on the phone with Martin moments before he died. She testified that Martin told her someone was following him.

"A man was watching him," 19-year-old Jeantel said in court Wednesday. "He said the man kept watching him. He kept complaining that a man was just watching him."

Wednesday's proceedings ended with defense attorney Don West calling Jeantel's credibility into question. He asked her why she lied multiple times before the trial, and why her testimony doesn't match up with the transcript of a deposition she gave earlier.

Over the phone, Jeantel said she could hear Martin telling Zimmerman to "get off," testimony that could prove Zimmerman was the aggressor.

Jeantel appeared to become frustrated several times during West's cross-examination of her, including the point at which West suggested the court could break until the morning so she’d have more time to review the deposition transcript.

“No, I’m leaving today,” Jeantel told the defense attorney, as she looked over the papers.

“Are you refusing to come back tomorrow?” West asked.

Judge Debra Nelson then stepped in and told West to keep the questions and answers to Jeantel’s testimony.

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