Key witness recounts Martin's final phone call

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  • HLN is covering the George Zimmerman trial live, gavel to gavel -- follow along with HLN's live blog
  • Zimmerman is charged with second-degree murder for killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin on Feb. 26, 2012
Rachel Jeantel, the last person to talk to Trayvon Martin, testifies in the George Zimmerman trial.

Taking the stand on the third day of the George Zimmerman trial, a friend of Trayvon Martin testified about the final moments of the teenager’s life, saying that Martin told her someone was following him.

"A man was watching him," said 19-year-old Rachel Jeantel, who was on the phone with Martin just before he was fatally shot. "He said the man kept watching him. He kept complaining that a man was just watching him."

That man was Zimmerman, a former neighborhood watch captain charged with second-degree murder for killing 17-year-old Martin in Sanford, Florida, on Feb. 26, 2012. He told police he was pursuing the teenager because there had been a rash of crime in the area. A confrontation ensued, and Zimmerman said he was forced to kill Martin in self-defense.

Read more: See Zimmerman's neighborhood watch guide (pdf)

Jeantel testified Wednesday that, as he neared the home of his father's girlfriend, Martin tried to lose Zimmerman.

"And then he said, 'That N-word is still following me now,'" said Jeantel. "I asked him how the man looked like. He just told me the man looked 'creepy.' 'Creepy, white' -- excuse my language -- 'cracker. Creepy [expletive] cracker."

Jeantel says she heard Martin talking to Zimmerman in the background of the call.

"He said, 'Why are you following me for?' And I heard a hard-breathing man say, 'What you doing around here?'" said Jeantel.

Jeantel also said she heard a bump from Martin’s headset hitting something and "wet grass sounds."

"I start hearing a little bit of Trayvon saying, 'Get off, get off!'" said Jeantel.

She told the prosecutor that the screams for help heard on the 911 call made by a neighbor belong to Martin. But on cross-examination, defense attorney Don West read part of a transcript from Jeantel's deposition, in which she said she wasn't sure if it was Martin's voice or not.

"It could be. Like I said, I don't know but it could be," said Jeantel, according to the transcript. "The dude sound kind of like Trayvon. Trayvon do got that soft voice and that baby voice sometimes, so it could be, I don't know."

Jeantel admitted to West that she lied several times to Martin's family. She said she told them she was 16, not 18, because she wanted to be treated like a minor and have privacy. She also said she lied about not attending Martin's memorial service because she was in the hospital. The truth, she said, was that she was afraid to see the body.

"You got to understand, you the last person to talk to the person and he died on the phone after you talked to him -- you got to understand what I'm trying to tell you," said Jeantel. "I'm the last person, you don't know how it felt. You think I really want to go see the body after I just talked to him?" Jeantel.

Jeantel appeared to get frustrated several times during the cross-examination, including one time when West suggested they could break until the morning so she’d have more time to review the deposition transcript.

“No, I’m leaving today,” Jeantel told the defense attorney as she looked over the papers.

“Are you refusing to come back tomorrow?” asked West.

The judge stepped in and asked West to keep the questions and answers to Jeantel’s testimony.

Earlier in the afternoon, jurors heard five other non-emergency calls Zimmerman made reporting suspicious people in his neighborhood. The defense wanted the calls to be thrown out, questioning their relevance, but the judge ruled they would be allowed in. Prosecutors had argued that the calls show Zimmerman’s state of mind the night he shot Martin. 

In one of the calls, made on Feb. 2, 2012, about three weeks before Martin's death, Zimmerman tells the dispatcher he saw a black man walking around a neighbor's home. He said he had seen this man also walking around the neighborhood on trash days.

"I don't know what he's doing, I don't want to approach him, personally," said Zimmerman on the recording.

In another call made in October 2011, Zimmerman reports two "suspicious characters" who were "just hanging out, loitering" in his neighborhood. When the dispatcher asks if he can still see the suspects, Zimmerman said no because he "didn't want to attract attention" to himself.

An eyewitness who also testified on Wednesday said she heard what sounded “like a boy" cry for help during the altercation that ended in Martin's death.

Jayne Surdyka, Zimmerman’s former neighbor, said she heard screams and opened her window to look out into the courtyard on the night of the shooting.

Defense attorney Don West challenged Surdyka about what she heard that night, saying it is possible for a teenager to have a deeper voice, and for a man to have a higher-pitched voice.

"It sounded more like a boy to me," said Surdyka.

Multiple times Wednesday, Surdyka said she saw two men struggling on the ground, one on top of the other, but she couldn't discern who was on top, because it was dark and rainy that night.

Prosecutor Bernie De La Rionda played for the jury the 911 call Surdyka made the night of shooting. On the recording, Surdyka is heard crying and becoming hysterical. The 911 operator stayed on the phone with her to calm her down.

Prosecutors also called Jeannee Manalo, another eyewitness, to the stand Wednesday. Manalo testified that, from her point of view inside her townhome, she could see two men struggling on the ground. She also said she believes Zimmerman was on top of Martin during the altercation, and that she could see his hands moving.

During cross-examination, Manalo said photographs she saw on the news of a younger Martin support her view that Zimmerman was on top during the altercation. Defense attorney Mark O’Mara asked her if she had ever seen recent photos of Martin. She said no, but maintained that, based on the photographs, the bigger person was on top -- and Zimmerman seemed to be the bigger person.

Before court recessed for the day, the defense told the judge it expects to need a couple more hours to question Martin's friend, Jeantel. Testimony is scheduled to resume at 9 a.m. ET on Thursday.

HLN is live-blogging Zimmerman's trial. Click here for HLN's live blog of Tuesday's proceedings. Read below for minute-by-minute updates:

5:12 p.m. ET: West asks to recess until Thursday but the prosecutor wants to continue. The judge asks how much longer West will take and he says they should plan on a couple more hours to which Jeantel replies, "What?" The judge has recessed court until 9 a.m. ET Thursday.

5:11 p.m. ET: West reads part of the transcript where Jeantel is asked if the voice in the background of the 911 call belongs to Martin: "It could be. Like I said, I don't know but it could be. The dude sound kind of like Trayvon. Trayvon do got that soft voice and that baby voice sometimes, so it could be, I don't know." Jeantel admits she said that in the deposition.

5:10 p.m. ET: West tells Jeantel they can give her more time to go over the transcript and resume tomorrow. She says she's going to finish today. West asks her if she's refusing to testify. The judge tells West to keep the questions based on her testimony.

5:08 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she heard the 911 call made by a neighbor on TV. She says she told them in the deposition that it sounded like Martin's voice yelling in the back. Defense attorney West approaches her again with a transcript from the deposition, which she is reading.

5:06 p.m. ET: According to the deposition, Jeantel told Crump that Zimmerman said, "What're you talking about?" In the deposition, she said that was her answer but in court she says she had rushed her interview and that isn't her answer.

5:03 p.m. ET: In the deposition, West asks Jeantel what Zimmerman said when Martin asked him why he was following him. Jeantel is reviewing the transcript.

4:59 p.m. ET: Defense attorney West has approached with Jeantel with a transcript of her deposition and has asked her to take as much time as she needs to read it.

4:57 p.m. ET: The judge is back on the bench and the jury is being seated.

4:38 p.m. ET: The judge has recessed court for a 15-minute break.

4:34 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

4:33 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she rushed her interview with Martin family attorney Benjamin Crump because she didn't want to talk about death.

"You didn't take it seriously?" asked defense attorney West.

"Nope," said Jeantel.

"If you weren't going to take it seriously, why didn't you refuse to do it?" asked West.

"I'm already there on the phone," said Jeantel.

"But you're at home," said West.

"In the closet. You think I wanted to be in the closet that long?" said Jeantel.

4:30 p.m. ET: Defense attorney West is asking Jeantel about a time he interviewed her -- it took about four hours. Jeantel says they were supposed to meet again later that week but West didn't want to talk to her. West apologizes for scheduling conflicts. They met again later.

4:25 p.m ET: Friends told Jeantel that she was being called the 16-year-old girlfriend of Martin. She said all the phone calls and text messages made it look like they were in a relationship.

"I did say, 'Stuff was going on,' that's it," said Jeantel, in reference to what she told Martin's family about their relationship. "There was another young lady that he was seeing."

4:21 p.m. ET: The day after the interview, Jeantel says her brother texted her to tell her that her voice was on television.

"I was just shocked that my voice on television," said Jeantel. She had said she didn't want her picture or identity released.

4:19 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she knew Martin's parents and their attorney would be present for her interview with Crump. She gave consent for it to be recorded, but not for it to be broadcast or released to the public. She didn't know parts of it would be released at a press conference. They asked her to repeats parts of it louder so it could be recorded correctly.

"I speak low," said Jeantel.

4:12 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

4:11 p.m. ET: When Crump asked Jeantel why she didn't go to the memorial service, she says she lied again and said she was at the hospital because Martin's mother was listening. Jeantel says she lied about her age -- that she was 16, not 18 -- because she wanted more privacy as a minor.

4:09 p.m. ET: The Martin family attorney, Benjamin Crump, did an interview with Jeantel. She says it was a phone interview and she knew she was going to be recorded and that Martin's parents would be listening as well. Jeantel says she didn't know a reporter from ABC News was present. She also didn't know that law enforcement wasn't present.

4:06 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she told Martin's mother that she didn't go to the memorial service because she had gone to the hospital. She admits that she lied.

4:04 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she didn't tell Martin's mother every detail, just that Martin was being followed. She also gave Martin's mom a letter.

West asks Jeantel why she didn't go to the memorial service.

"You got to understand, you the last person to talk to the person and he died on the phone after you talked to him -- you got to understand what I'm trying to tell you. I'm the last person, you don't know how it felt. You think I really want to go see the body after I just talked to him?" said Jeantel.

4:01 p.m. ET: Jeantel says her mother agreed to let her meet with Martin's mother.

"You didn't really want to?" asked defense attorney West.

"No," said Jeantel.

"Did you feel like you were caught in the middle here?" asked West.

"No, it just... the truth, I never wanted to see somebody cry. I'm not the kind of person who wants to see people cry. I'm not an emotional person. Her son dead," said Jeantel.

3:56 p.m. ET: Martin's mother left a long text message for Jeantel, asking her to talk to their attorney. Jeantel says she wanted to talk to her own mother first. Martin's mother thought she was a minor, like her son, but Jeantel says she was actually 18 at the time.

3:52 p.m. ET: Jeantel says Martin's dad asked her to talk to his attorney. She says she doesn't watch the news and didn't see any coverage on the case.

3:49 p.m. ET: Jeantel says Martin's father told her she might have been the last one to talk to him before he was shot.

3:44 p.m. ET: West asks Jeantel why she didn't tell police she was the last person to talk to Martin.

"I never thought I was a witness of this situation," said Jeantel. She says she heard the man who shot Martin had been caught and she thought the police would track down her number and reach out to her.

3:39 p.m. ET: "I believed it was just a fight. He had already told me he was by his father's house. I thought his father was going to help him... I never thought it was that deadly serious," said Jeantel.

3:35 p.m. ET: Defense attorney West asks Jeantel what she was talking to Martin about as he left the store, before Zimmerman spotted him.

"He got caught by the rain, he was at the mailing area," said Jeantel. She says he took a shortcut to get there.

3:32 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she talked to Martin while he was on his way to the store, while he was inside the store and when he was on his way home from the store.

3:30 p.m. ET: Defense attorney Don West is going over call records between Martin and Jeantel, looking at the exact times of those calls.

3:26 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she saw Martin a lot in February. They talked and text a lot, too. She says she was texting and talking with him a lot the day he died.

3:22 p.m. ET: The jury is being seated.

2:58 p.m. ET: Jeantel says the voices heard in the background of the 911 call belong to Martin. The prosecutor has finished his direct examination and the judge has recessed court for 20 minutes.

2:57 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she lied about going to the funeral and wake because she felt guilty.

2:56 p.m. ET: A friend of Jeantel's who went to Martin's wake told her Martin was dead.

Prosecutor de la Rionda asks Jeantel why she didn't go to the wake.

"I didn't want to see the body," said Jeantel, getting emotional. She starts to wipe tears from her eyes.

2:54 p.m. ET: Jeantel talks about how she found out Martin had died. She says she didn't realize she had spoken to him the day he died.

2:51 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she was quiet for a bit on the phone and then she says she heard Martin speaking.

"He said, 'Why are you following me for?' And I heard a hard-breathing man say, 'What you doing around here?'" said Jeantel.

She also says she heard a bump and "wet grass sounds."

"I start hearing a little bit of Trayvon saying, ‘Get off, get off,'" said Jeantel.

2:47 p.m. ET: Jeantel called Martin back and he said he was walking and closer to his dad's fiance's house.

"A second later Trayvon come say [expletive]," said Jeantel. "The [expletive] behind me."

2:45 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she told Martin to start running but he said he was close to his dad's fiance's home. Then Martin told her he was going to start running "from the back."

“I start hearing wind and the phone just shut off,” said Jeantel.

2:42 p.m. ET: "He started walking home," said Jeantel. They changed the subject to the basketball game happening that day.

"And then he said that [expletive] is still following me now," said Jeantel.

The court reporter is having trouble hearing so the judge asks Jeantel to answer again.

"Now the [expletive] is following me," said Jeanel.

2:39 p.m. ET: “He just told me he wanted to try to lose him,” said Jeantel.

2:37 p.m. ET: "I asked him how the man looked like. He just told me the man looked creepy. Creepy, white. Excuse my language, cracker. Creepy [expletive] cracker," said Jeantel.

2:35 p.m. ET: "A man was watching him," said Jeantel. "He said the man kept watching him. He kept complaining that a man was just watching him."

2:32 p.m. ET: Jeantel says she was just friends with Martin, they had never gone out on a formal date. The two of them were talking on the phone the night he was shot. He told her it was raining that night and he was going to get candy and a soft drink from the store.

2:30 p.m. ET: The prosecution calls 19-year-old Rachel Jeantel to the stand. She was friends with Martin, having met him him elementary school.

2:27 p.m. ET: Rumph says there is no database that identifies people who call 911 or the non-emergency line several times. Zimmerman called fives times in six months. Rumph says she wouldn't be able to tell if this is unusual for a neighborhood watch volunteer unless she did more research. Rump has been excused but is subject to being recalled.

2:26 p.m. ET: O'Mara tries asking Rumph if she hears anything of concern in Zimmerman's voice. The prosecution objects and the judge tells O'Mara he could call Rumph as his own witness.

2:22 p.m. ET: The call forms don't give Rumph any more details about the contact police officers made with any of the subjects. Rumph tells defense attorney O'Mara the names of the officers who would be able to give more details about the incidents. 

2:20 p.m. ET: Rumph says police came into contact with two subjects on August 6, 2011. They also came into contact with two subjects related to the call on October 1, 2011. The prosecutor has finished his direct examination.

2:19 p.m. ET: The fifth and last call was made at 8:29 p.m. ET on February 2, 2012. Zimmerman says he's seen a black man walking around on trash days. This same man is walking about a neighbor's house. "I don't know what he's doing, I don't want to approach him, personally," says Zimmerman.

2:16 p.m. ET: The fourth non-emergency call was made at 12:53 a.m. on October 1, 2011. Zimmerman reports two "suspicious characters." "They're just hanging out, loitering," says Zimmerman. He describes them as two African American males in their mid-to-late 20's or their early 30's. "I didn't want to attract attention," he tells the dispatcher.

2:14 p.m. ET: The third non-emergency call being played in court was made at 11:08 p.m. ET on September 23, 2011. Zimmerman says someone in the neighborhood had their garage door open. "It's late and they usually don't have their garage door open all night," says Zimmerman. He tells the dispatcher they just had a neighborhood watch meeting and were told to report anything suspicious.

2:11 p.m. ET: The next non-emergency call being played in court was made at 10:20 p.m. ET on August 6, 2011. Zimmerman is reporting two young black men in their late teens. He mentions the neighborhood having been broken into recently. "They typically run away quickly and I think they head over to the next neighborhood over," says Zimmerman.

2:09 p.m. ET: Prosecutors are playing a non-emergency call made by Zimmerman reporting a suspicious person on August 3, 2011 at 6:45 p.m. ET. He says he doesn't want to give out his address because he's afraid the suspect could still be nearby. He describes the man as black and wearing a white tank top, black shorts. He says their neighborhood was robbed that day and the man looks like the person who did it.

2:05 p.m. ET: The prosecutor is going back over the 911 and non-emergency lines with Rumph and asking her about the times and dates of specific calls.

2:03 p.m. ET: Prosecutors call Ramona Rumph back to the witnesses stand. She maintains the calls received on the 911 and non-emergency lines. She testified on the first day of trial.

1:59 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'Mara is going over a statement that Manalo made to the prosecutor about the individuals' sizes. She says she based her opinion on the photos.

Prosecutor de la Rionda asks one more question: "The person who got up was the person on top, correct?"

"Yes," said Manalo. She has been excused.

1:58 p.m. ET: Prosecutor de la Rionda asks Mandalo if she remembers telling him in a sworn statement that, "I think Zimmerman is definitely on top because of his size." She says yes.

1:56 p.m. ET:

1:54 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

1:52 p.m. ET: Manalo tells the prosecutor that, based on the pictures, Zimmerman was the bigger of the two individuals that night.

1:50 p.m. ET: "But you’re not certain, as you sit here today, who was where in that altercation?" asked O'Mara.

"No," said Manalo.

O'Mara has finished his cross-examination.

1:48 p.m. ET: Manalo says she hasn't seen any current photos of Martin and the way he would have looked that night. She was comparing a current photo of Zimmerman to the photos of Martin in a football jersey.

1:44 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

1:42 p.m. ET: Manalo says the only way she would know if she was mistaking the identity of the individuals involved in the struggle is to see a recent picture of Martin.

1:40 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

1:39 p.m. ET: Manalo says she looked at several photos including one of Martin in a football jersey to determine the size of the individuals involved in the struggle.

1:35 p.m. ET: The photos of Martin are being entered into evidence.

1:32 p.m. ET: The jury was not present for the previous line of questioning. Jurors are now being seated.

1:31 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'mara has approached Manalo and is showing her pictures of a younger Martin. She says she used the photos to identify who was on top and who was on bottom during the struggle. O'Mara also shows her screen grabs from surveillance video at the 7-Eleven that night showing Martin. She says she didn't see those images.

1:25 p.m. ET: The judge is back on the bench and the attorneys are at a sidebar.

12:01 p.m. ET: Nelson has recessed court for lunch. The live blog will pick back up when court resumes at 1:10 p.m. ET.

11:59 a.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar now.

11:57 a.m. ET: Manalo said she doesn't know who is bigger Zimmerman or Martin now.

11:54 a.m. ET: O'Mara has asked Manalo to describe a photo she saw of Martin that she used as a comparison to Zimmerman's size. Manalo said the photo of Martin was one of the first ones they used in the news.

11:46 a.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

11:45 a.m. ET: Manalo said she did not see that Zimmerman's face was bloody the night of the shooting. She only saw got a glance at the profile of his face.

 

11:42 a.m. ET:

11:40 a.m. ET: O'Mara is pointing having Manalo point out where she saw one man on top of the other.

11:37 a.m. ET: Manalo is reviewing her statement she gave to the police the night of the shooting. O'Mara asked if Manalo said she described the size of the two men on the ground. Manalo says that it seems that she didn't.

11:34 a.m. ET: O'Mara is reviewing his materials.

11:33 a.m. ET: O'Mara asked if her Manalo's statement she gave police that night is more accurate than her testimony today. Manalo said she did not understand the question.

11:30 a.m. ET: Manalo said she could not tell where the "help" sound she heard came from, but it was closer than the initial howling sound she heard.

11:28 a.m. ET: O'Mara is pointing out on a map where Manalo saw the two men on the ground.

11:26 a.m. ET: De La Rionda has finished his direct examination. Defense attorney Mark O'Mara is about to begin his cross examination of Manalo.

11:22 a.m. ET: De La Rionda is showing Manalo pictures of the courtyard so the jurors can see her point of view of the shooting.

11:19 a.m. ET: The paramedic asked Manalo's husband for a plastic bag to help stop the bleeding.

11:18 a.m. ET: Manalo's husband went outside to see what was going on after they heard the gun go off.

11:15 a.m. ET: Manalo said she saw movement with men's hands, and the person on top was bigger than the person on the bottom.

11:12 a.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

11:09 a.m. ET: Prosecutor De La Rionda is asking Manalo about what details of the altercation she saw.

11:08 a.m. ET: Manalo saw a neighbor come out of his house across the courtyard.

11:05 a.m. ET: Manalo said she heard a noise that sound like someone calling for help. When she looked out the sliding door a second time she saw two people on the ground.

11:04 a.m. ET: "I heard howling sound." said Manalo. "I looked out the sliding door."

Manalo said she did not see anything when she look out the sliding door after the howling sound.

11:02 a.m. ET: Manalo was in her living room with her family at the time of shooting. The back of her house faces the courtyard, the location of the shooting.

11:01 a.m. ET: Manalo was living in Zimmerman's neighborhood at the time of the shooting.

10:58 a.m. ET: Prosecutors has called their next witness, Jeannee Manalo.

10:55 a.m. ET: The parties are in the courtroom. Testimony should begin any minute.

10:40 a.m. ET: Court is in a 15 minute recess.

10:38 a.m. ET: Surdyka said she went on national television and told a reporter what she saw and heard that night. Her identity and voice was obscured during the interview.

10:35 a.m. ET: West has pointed out multiple times that Surdyka told the 911 operator that she didn't want to be a witness, but shortly after the shooting she told police officers she did want to be a witness.

10:33 a.m. ET: Surdyka spoke to police officers at the scene, and eventually gave them a written account of what she saw that night.

10:30 a.m. ET: Surdyka said before had not heard Zimmerman's or Martin's voices before the night of the shooting. She also said she still hasn't heard either of their voices to this day.

10:27 a.m. ET: West asked Surdyka if it is possible for a 17-teen-year-old to have a deep voice.

Surdyka said she guessed it was possible.

10:24 a.m. ET: Surdyka said heard two voices that night one dominate and another one that sounded higher pitch boy.

"It sounded more like a boy to me," said Surdyka.

10:21 a.m. ET: "That's what I saw, and that's the only thing I can tell you is what I saw and hearing the shouts, and he was face down," said Surdyka.

10:18 a.m. ET: West asked Surdyka if she saw a muzzle blast. Surdyka replied that she didn't know what muzzle blast was.

10:15 a.m. ET: West asked Surdyka if she was watching the altercation when the gun was fired. She said she believes she was watching when the gun went off.

10:11 a.m. ET: Surdyka said she thought she was on the phone with the 911 operator when the shots were fired. West questioned if that was true. He asked if her she was describing to the operator what she heard after the gunfire, and Surdyka said she was not sure.

10:08 a.m. ET: West is trying to pick apart Surdyka's account of the night of the shooting, making multiple references to how dark it was that night, and how hard it was to see due to the rain.

10:05 a.m. ET: West is having Surdyka point on the map where she saw the men on the ground. However, she says she is not sure where on the map exactly the voices she heard came from.

10:01 a.m. ET: Surdyka said five to 10 minutes passed from the first loud voice from the moment she heard the fight.

9:58 a.m. ET: West asked, "At what point did you realize this was a really serious event? One that help is desperatly needed."

"When I shut my nightlight off, and I could see two men on the ground. I knew it was something very serious," said Surdyka.

9:55 a.m. ET: West asked Surdyka if she thought she heard screaming for help or mercy. She said she thought the person was screaming for help one time and then a yelp right before the gun when off.

9:51 a.m. ET: De La Rionda has finished his direct examination of Surdyka, and now defense attorney Don West will ask her questions on cross examination. The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

 

 

9:49 a.m. ET: The operator told Surdyka she needs to speak with an officer, and tell him what she saw.

9:45 a.m. ET: Eventually, Surdyka calms down, and the operator is able to get her address from her, and more details about what she saw in the courtyard.

9:42 a.m. ET: Surdyka does not seem fazed by listening to herself be emotional on the 911 call.

9:40 a.m. ET: Surdyka began to cry and panicked on the 911 call, because she was worried someone was killed. Martin's parents are composed as they listen to the 911 call.

9:37 a.m. ET: One the 911 call, Surdyka can be heard telling the operator she heard a "bang" or "pop."

"Oh my god I don't know what he did to that person," said Surdyka.

The operator said that she isn't the only person who has called 911 about the incident, and they have an officer on the scene.

9:35 a.m. ET: The court is having technical problems with playing the 911 call.

9:34 a.m. ET: Da La Rionda is now playing Surdyka's 911 call from the night of the shooting.

9:32 a.m. ET: Prosecutor De La Rionda is showing Surdyka pictures of the crime scene to demonstrate what Surdyka saw that night.

 

9:29 a.m. ET: A neighbor came out of another townhome and walked towards Zimmerman according to Surdyka. She also said Zimmerman was holding his hand to his forehead.

9:27 a.m. ET: Surdyka said Zimmerman got up after the teenager and started to walk towards her townhome.

9:25 a.m. ET: "I heard like from my window a pop, pop, pop." said Surdyka. "You know I don't know what a gun really sounds like."

9:24 a.m. ET: Surdyka said the last yelp she heard was made by the "boy" in her opinion.

9:22 a.m. ET: "I could see two people one the ground. One on top of each other." said Surdyka.

9:19 a.m. ET: Surdyka said shut off the lights in her townhome so she could see into the courtyard better.

9:16 a.m. ET: "All I could really hear. You know I guess I expected to open the window and like hear a conversation going on. But it really wasn't like someone out there just talking. When I opened the window a very aggressive voice. Someone sounded very angry, very agitated, and that kind of struck me. I don't know why I didn't hear the words," said Surdyka.

9:14 a.m. ET: After hearing voices, Surdyka opened a window and could see into the courtyard.

9:13 a.m. ET: Surdyka said she got up to close the window of her townhome, because it was raining on Feburary 26, 2012. Shortly after closing the window, she heard a loud "dominant" voice.

9:10 a.m. ET: Prosecutor Bernie De La Rionda has called Jayne Surdyka to the stand. She was living in the Zimmerman's neighborhood, Resort at Twin Lakes, at the time of the shooting.

9:07 a.m. ET: Here are some notes on the alternate juror that was just dismissed:

  • Appears to be the youngest on the panel
  • Resident of Seminole  County, Florida for nine years
  • From Chicago
  • Single no kids
  • Working at current job for 1 year
  • No prior jury service

9:05 a.m. ET: Nelson has ruled that the five calls Zimmerman made reporting other suspicious people in his neighborhood will be admissible. An alternate juror has been dismissed for reasons unrelated to the trial.

9:00 a.m. ET: Judge Debra Nelson is on the stand, and the attorneys have joined her for a sidebar.

8:36 a.m. ET: Court is scheduled to start at 9:00 a.m. ET.

8:30 a.m. ET:

Prosecutors in the George Zimmerman trial could call a parade of eyewitnesses to the stand Wednesday to try to prove the former neighborhood watch captain intended to kill Trayvon Martin.

Interactive map: The Trayvon Martin killing

Zimmerman is charged with second-degree murder for killing 17-teen-year old Martin February 26, 2012. He told police he was pursuing the teenager because there had been a rash of crime in the area. A conflict ensued, and Zimmerman said he was forced to kill Martin in self-defense.

Selene Bahadoor, the first eyewitness to the shooting to testify, took the stand at the end of Tuesday's proceedings. Bahadoor said she isn't sure herself what she saw and heard that night.

A resident of Zimmerman’s gated community, Bahadoor testified that she looked out her kitchen window that night after hearing a noise.

"It was not clearly distinguishable, but it sounded like, 'No' or 'Uhhh' -- that's what it sounded like," said Bahadoor. She also heard “something hitting the concrete, it sounded like running.”

She said the view from her kitchen window was blocked, so she moved to the sliding glass doors at the back of her townhome.

“I saw what looked as figures and arms flailing,” said Bahadoor. She says it was too dark for her to identify the individuals or to clearly see what position they were in.

Bahadoor said a neighbor offered to call police and she went back inside to turn off her stove. That’s when she heard the gunshot.

Prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda asked her what she saw upon her return to the glass doors.

"It was just a body in the grass," said Bahadoor. "I remember it being face down."

Defense attorney Mark O'Mara called Bahadoor's motives into question when he pointed out to jurors that she signed a petition on Change.org in favor of prosecuting Zimmerman.

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