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Jurors see photos of Trayvon Martin’s body

NEED TO KNOW
  • HLN is covering the George Zimmerman trial live, gavel to gavel
  • Zimmerman is charged with second-degree murder for killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin on February 26, 2012

Prosecutors in the George Zimmerman trial walked jurors through several pieces of evidence on Tuesday, including photos of Trayvon Martin's dead body.

Martin’s father, Tracy, exited the courtroom as the photos were displayed. Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, remained seated but avoided looking at the images. She eventually left the courtroom as well. Zimmerman looked down as a close-up of Martin’s face flashed on screen.

Zimmerman, a former neighborhood watch captain, is charged with second-degree murder for shooting 17-year-old Martin on February 26, 2012. He told police he was pursuing the teenager because there had been a rash of crime in the area. A conflict ensued, and Zimmerman said he was forced to kill Martin in self-defense.

Prosecutor John Guy had a crime scene technician show jurors the gun Zimmerman used to shoot Martin. The technician, Diana Smith, also showed them the soft drink and Skittles Martin bought that night, along with photos of Zimmerman’s head, hands and clothing taken after he arrived at the police station.

The defense used the photos as an opportunity to walk jurors through each of Zimmerman’s injuries.

“You see the lumping? You see the lumps around the abrasions and in general on the back of his head?” asked defense attorney Don West.

He pointed out lumps all over Zimmerman’s head, cuts on the back of the head and blood behind one of Zimmerman’s ears. West said in opening statements that Martin used the concrete sidewalk as a “deadly weapon” against Zimmerman.

Anthony Raimondo, a patrol sergeant who was one of the first to arrive on the scene, said he broke standard operating procedures by giving Martin mouth-to-mouth resuscitation without a protective mask. He said he considered the situation to be an “extraordinary circumstance.”

Raimondo also described how he lifted Martin’s body to find the exit wound on the teen’s back. He said he asked bystanders for a plastic bag to help seal the wound. When more responders arrived later, they pronounced Martin dead. Raimondo said he was the one to cover Martin’s body with a blanket.

Selene Bahadoor, a resident of Zimmerman’s gated community, testified that she looked out her kitchen window that night after hearing noise.

"It was not clearly distinguishable but it sounded like, 'No' or 'Uhhh' -- that's what it sounded like," said Bahadoor. She also heard “something hitting the concrete, it sounded like running.”

She said  the view from the kitchen window was blocked, so she moved to the sliding glass doors at the back of her townhome.

“I saw what looked as figures and arms flailing,” said Bahadoor. She says it was too dark for her to identify the individuals or to clearly see what position they were in.

Bahadoor said a neighbor offered to call police and she went back inside to turn off her stove. That’s when she heard the gunshot.

Prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda asked her what she saw upon her return to the glass doors.

"It was just a body in the grass," said Bahadoor. "I remember it being face down."

Wendy Dorival, who was a volunteer program manager for the Sanford, Florida, police department in 2012, coordinated and helped start the neighborhood watch programs in Zimmerman's community.

Dorival said she worked closely with Zimmerman, because he helped organize the program for his neighborhood. She told him a neighborhood watch volunteer should act as the "eyes and ears" of the police -- but not like a vigilante.

"If you see a car driving around in circles, and you don't recognize the car in your community, that might be suspicious." said Dorival. "If people are walking around in areas that not typically walked on, that could be suspicious."

Earlier in the morning, Judge Debra Nelson heard arguments on whether the jury should hear about other times when Zimmerman reported suspicious people in his neighborhood, the Retreat at Twin Lakes.

Prosecutor Rich Mantei said Zimmerman's prior phone calls reporting suspicious people in the neighborhood is relevant to the case, because it helps prove motive by showing his "building level of frustration."

Zimmerman's defense disagreed. "They are going to be asking this jury to make a quantum leap from good responsible citizen behavior to seething anger," said defense attorney Mark O'Mara.

The judge has yet to make a ruling on the matter.

Testimony in the trial will resume at 9:00 a.m. ET on Wednesday.

HLN is live-blogging Zimmerman's trial. Click here for HLN's live blog of Monday's proceedings. Read below for minute-by-minute updates:

5:24 p.m. ET: The judge has recessed court for the day. Testimony will resume Wednesday at 9:00 a.m. ET.

5:23 p.m. ET: O'Mara shows Bahadoor her Facebook page and points out that she signed a petition on Change.org in favor of prosecuting Zimmerman. O'Mara has finished his questions and Bahadoor has been excused.

5:21 p.m. ET: Prosecutor de la Rionda has finished his re-direct examination. O'Mara asks Bahadoor if she wanted to be on national TV.

"I was only doing it so they could bring attention to what had happened," said Bahadoor.

5:17 p.m. ET: Bahadoor says investigators never asked her specifically about the direction of the running. She also says the defense attorneys never asked her specifically about the direction of the running during her deposition.

5:14 p.m. ET: Bahadoor says she wanted to remain silent and not get involved at all. She came forward when police held a meeting in the community, asking people who saw things to come forward.

5:12 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'Mara has Bahadoor demonstrate for the jury what the flailing arms she saw looked like.

"I just saw arms moving up and down," she said, calling the motion "fast-paced."

O'Mara has finished his cross-examination of Bahadoor.

5:10 p.m. ET: Bahadoor has heard the 911 call in the media. The screams she heard were similar to the ones heard in the background of the call. She says they could be the same ones.

5:07 p.m. ET: Bahadoor looks at a sketch she made for police and says it shows where her house is and where she believes she saw arms.

5:04 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

5:03 p.m. ET: O'Mara asks Bahadoor if she liked the "Justice for Trayvon Martin" Facebook page. She says yes but says, "I have sympathy for both." She says the opportunity didn't present itself for her to like a page for Zimmerman on Facebook.

5:02 p.m. ET: Bahadoor says she gave her first statement when the community had a town hall about the incident.

Defense attorney O'Mara asks her if she realized she had witnessed a shooting.

"I didn't think what I saw was significant -- or what I heard was significant," said Bahadoor.

5:00 p.m. ET: When she heard the gunshot, Bahadoor went upstairs to be with her sister.

4:57 p.m. ET: Bahadoor points out on a map where she was looking out the window. She says it was too dark to determine how the individuals were standing or if one was on top of the other.

4:53 p.m. ET: Bahadoor says her sister was upstairs during the incident and she's not sure what she saw. O'Mara asks if her sister told her she would say she saw something even though she didn't. The prosecution objects and the judge sustains.

4:51 p.m. ET: “I don’t see mention of left-to-right,” said Bahadoor, in reference to the transcript of her deposition.

“Was today the first time you ever said to anybody… that there was movement from left-to-right? Was today the first time?” asked O’Mara.

“Well based on these transcripts, it was the first time being recorded,” said Bahadoor.

“No, I’m asking you, right here today, is this the first time you mentioned to anybody that there was movement from left-to-right?” asked O’Mara.

“No,” said Bahadoor.

“Who was the first person that you told that to?” asked O’Mara.

“When I talked to my sister,” said Bahadoor.

4:47 p.m. ET: Bahadoor says she mentions movement in the transcript but nothing about the direction of the movement. O'Mara asks her to review a transcript of her deposition.

4:44 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'Mara has handed Bahadoor another transcript, which she is reviewing.

4:42 p.m. ET: Bahadoor is looking at a transcript from one of her interviews with investigators.

"It did not mention left or right," said Bahadoor.

She told investigators she "couldn't really see back there" because the lights weren't on. She told them about seeing arms flailing and that there was running in the back -- but not which direction it was going.

4:38 p.m. ET: Bahadoor says she was with her sister when she met with an investigator for the state attorney’s office last week. She says they weren't discussing testimony but just asking if the two were comfortable.

"For 45 minutes?" asked O'Mara.

"Yes," said Bahadoor.

4:36 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

4:35 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'Mara asks Bahadoor about a deposition transcript. She says she reviewed it and can't remember if she told them about the direction of the movement outside her back door.

O'Mara asks if it's possible that the first time she's introducing this evidence is during her testimony today.

"It could be, I don't know," said Bahadoor.

4:32 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

4:31 p.m. ET: Bahadoor says she can't recall if she told another investigator about the direction of the running noise.

4:29 p.m. ET: Bahadoor says she believes mentioning a noise to investigators but doesn't know if she told them which direction it went. She says she can't remember the first person she told about the direction of the noise.

4:24 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

4:23 p.m. ET: The last person Bahadoor spoke to about her testimony was an investigator for the state attorney's office. She says he gave her a transcript to help her prepare for her testimony. She says she can't remember if she told investigators originally that the running noise went "left to right" behind her house. Defense attorney O'Mara wants to give her the transcript to refresh her memory.

4:20 p.m. ET: Zimmerman previously introduced himself to Bahadoor as a neighborhood watch person. Prosecutor de la Rionda has finished his direct examination.

4:18 p.m. ET: Bahadoor points out on another diagram where she heard the running going behind her home.

4:14 p.m. ET: Prosecutor de la Rionda gets Bahadoor to confirm on a map the direction she heard the running going by her home.

4:12 p.m. ET: Bahadoor turned the stove off and went back to the sliding glass door. Prosecutor de la Rionda asks her what she observed.

"It was just a body in the grass," said Bahadoor. "I remember it being face down."

The prosecutor then asks her about the gunshot.

"When I went to take the stove off, that's when the shot occurred," she said.

4:10 p.m. ET: Bahadoor saw two other people looking out at the scene. One person came out on his porch.

"What I remember him saying is, 'What is going on out here? Do you need me to call the cops?' He said it twice," said Bahadoor, then went back inside. She remembers the individuals standing.

4:06 p.m. ET: Prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda asks Bahadoor if she heard screaming.

"I just heard what sounded like, 'No,'" said Bahadoor. She didn't see their faces and couldn't give a clothing description.

4:04 p.m. ET: Bahadoor says she looked outside but couldn't see anything because her view was obstructed so she moved to the sliding glass doors.

“I saw what looked as figures and arms flailing,” said Bahadoor. It looked like two individuals in a standing position. She says it was too dark to identify them.

4:00 p.m. ET: It was raining intermittently that night, according to Bahadoor. She heard a noise in the rear of the house at some point.

"It was not clearly distinguishable but it sounded like, 'No' or 'Uhhh' -- that's what it sounded like," said Bahadoor.

She also heard a noise that sounded like running.

"It sounded like something hitting the concrete, it sounded like running," said Bahadoor.

3:58 p.m. ET: Bahadoor's bi-level townhome has three bedrooms upstairs. She was home on the night of the incident with her sister, niece and her niece's friend. There's a shared backyard and the porch is screened in with a door. She was downstairs in the rear of the townhome.

3:55 p.m. ET: The prosecution has called Selene Bahadoor to the stand. She works as an IT analyst at a hospital and lived in Zimmerman's neighborhood.

3:52 p.m. ET: Smith says a few of the officers on scene helped her search for blood by using flashlights. She was not notified of any blood. The prosecution has finished its questions and Smith has been excused.

3:49 p.m. ET: Martin's sweatshirt is displayed in court by Prosecutor Guy. He also displays the undershirt worn by Martin.

3:46 p.m. ET: Prosecutor Guy begins his re-direct examination. Smith says she needs consent from the medical examiner's office before she can pull things out of a victim's pockets because they have custody of the body.

3:44 p.m. ET: “You see the lumping? You see the lumps around the abrasions and in general on the back of his head?” asked West.

“Yes, I do,” said Smith.

West has finished his cross-examination of Smith.

3:42 p.m. ET: Zimmerman's injuries were on his face and head, according to Smith. Defense attorney West is showing some of the photos in court again and asks about lumps on Zimmerman's head and blood behind his left ear.

3:39 p.m. ET: Smith says she took pictures of Zimmerman at the police station sometime after 11 p.m. that night. She said he had already been there several hours. She says she's not sure if he had been provided a bathroom to clean up before the pictures.

3:36 p.m. ET: Smith says there can be a result for touch DNA if someone touches something and leaves behind enough skin cells. Defense attorney West asks if someone could wipe off the touch DNA and Smith says it's possible.

3:34 p.m. ET: The firearm, Skittles bag and flashlight were all tested for touch DNA, according to Smith. She performed the latent print examination after taking the swabs.

3:31 p.m. ET: West asks about the swabs Smith used in the case. She says they're sent to the laboratory, not the item itself. Smith also says the swabs don't say where they were taken on an item.

3:29 p.m. ET: Smith takes a look at Martin's pants, which are displayed in court, and says they look like the pants she collected.

3:25 p.m. ET: Defense attorney West asks if chemicals were used on the sidewalk to reveal the presence of blood. Smith says chemicals weren't used.

3:23 p.m. ET: Smith says she may have taken photos of Martin's body when the medical examiner's office arrived, but she's not sure. She says she can't recall if she removed the blanket from Martin's body to take pictures.

3:19 p.m. ET: Smith says she didn't think the evidence had been tampered with before her arrival.

3:14 p.m. ET: West asks Smith to estimate the distance between two evidence markers. She says she's unable to do that.

3:12 p.m. ET: Defense attorney Don West begins his cross-examination by asking Smith if she has ever been on patrol with her husband, who also works for the Sanford Police Department. She says she has been on ride-alongs with him.

3:10 p.m. ET: Court is back from recess and the jury is being seated.

2:44 p.m. ET: The prosecution has finished it's direct examination of Smith. The judge has recessed court for a 15-minute break.

2:43 p.m. ET: Prosecutor Guy gives Smith more evidence to examine including Martin's watch and the tools used to take scrapings from underneath Martin's fingers.

2:40 p.m. ET: Smith says she is not responsible for determining who a fingerprint belongs to. She also tested the Skittles bag and flashlight for DNA. She tested the flashlight for fingerprints and was unable to find any. She also didn't find fingerprints on the plastic bags or the small flashlight attached to the keys.

2:35 p.m. ET: Smith describes how she captures latent fingerprints. She was able to lift one fingerprint from Zimmerman's firearm.

2:32 p.m. ET: Smith shows jurors the gun that Zimmerman used to shoot Martin (the red is the gun's lock). She also shows them Zimmerman's holster. The gun's grip, trigger and back part of the slide were processed by Smith for touch DNA.

2:27 p.m. ET: Smith examines the packaging for the jacket, shirt and pants Zimmerman gave her that night.

2:25 p.m. ET: Prosecutor Guy shows the photos Smith took of Zimmerman, including photos of his head, hands and clothes. She also packaged all of his clothing.

2:21 p.m. ET: Smith took photos of Zimmerman at the police station. Prosecutor Guy walks through those photos with her.

2:19 p.m. ET: The shell casing was found by using a metal detector, according to Smith. She searched along the sidewalk and in between the buildings for blood evidence. She says she used a flashlight to look and didn't locate any blood at the scene (not even where Martin's body was found).

2:17 p.m. ET: Smith shows jurors several exhibits including the soft drink and Skittles Martin bought that night, a flashlight found on the scene, plastic bags given to the patrol sergeant to seal Martin's gunshot wound.

2:10 p.m. ET: Smith says she returned the next day to photograph the scene in the daylight. The ground was still wet, according to Smith.

2:07 p.m. ET: Prosecutor Guy is going over more photos with Smith including images of a cell phone, a flashlight, a button on Martin's sweatshirt, Martin's gunshot wound and the soft drink Martin bought that night. Zimmerman looks away as a close-up of Martin's face is displayed in court.

2:02 p.m. ET: Smith is also using the diagram to show jurors where different photos were taken at the crime scene.

1:59 p.m. ET: Smith walks jurors through a diagram of the crime scene and shows them where different pieces of evidence were found.

1:55 p.m. ET: Smith says she starts by photographing a scene. She does it in stages -- first without evidence markers and then with evidence markers. Some of her photos show how it was raining that night. Her diagram was used to make a computerized rendition of the crime scene.

1:52 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

1:50 p.m. ET: Smith responded to the scene where Martin was shot at around 7:55 p.m. ET. The scene had been taped off and they were experiencing rain showers on and off. It had been raining prior to her arrival.

1:47 p.m. ET: The prosecution calls Diana Smith to the witness stand. She is a crime scene technician with the Sanford Police Department.

1:44 p.m. ET: The defense has finished its questioning. The prosecutor asks Raimondo to clarify the conditions that night. Raimondo says it was drizzling. He has been excused.

1:43 p.m. ET: Raimondo says this photo shows the lighting conditions that night. He says the flash makes it a little brighter in the foreground than it really was.

1:38 p.m. ET: Raimondo is walking through the map of Zimmerman's neighborhood and the photos of Martin's body. Defense attorney O'Mara is asking him about the lighting conditions and the position of Martin's body. Raimondo says Martin was found facing down.

1:35 p.m. ET: Defense attorney O'Mara is asking Raimondo about his background and why he wanted to become a cop. Raimondo says he comes from a family of law enforcement.

"I think we all want to make a difference in our community, sir. You do what you can, when you can, and you just try and influence the audience you have in front of you," said Raimondo. He also says it has been rewarding for him. The prosecution objects to this line of questioning and O'Mara moves on.

1:33 p.m. ET: Prosecutor Guy shows two photos of Martin's body after he was pronounced dead -- one is a close-up image. Guy points out the CPR mask. He also shows photos of Martin's body once the blanket was placed over it. Another photo shows the grocery bag Raimondo was going to use to seal Martin's chest wound. The prosecution has finished its direct examination.

Martin's dad, Tracy, leaves the courtroom as the photos are displayed. His mother, Sybrina Fulton, remains seated but avoids looking at the photos. She eventually leaves the courtroom as well.

1:30 p.m. ET: Raimondo couldn't find an exit wound so he put Martin down on his back and continued CPR. When rescuers arrived, they hooked up an EKG machine to Martin. He was pronounced dead on the scene. Raimondo put an emergency blanket on Martin's body out of respect for Martin and his family and to preserve evidence.

1:27 p.m. ET: Raimondo heard bubbling sounds from Martin's chest. He asked the crowd for plastic wrap and Vaseline, which he would use to try and seal the chest wound. A bystander gave him a grocery bag. Raimondo raised Martin to a seated position so he could seal the exit wound on Martin's back first.

1:25 p.m. ET: Raimondo took Martin's pulse on his neck and says he didn't find anything. He moved his body onto his back and tried for a pulse again and didn't find anything.

"I breathed for Mr. Martin -- or I tried to, sir," said Raimondo.

Standard Operating Producers require him to use a mask but he says he didn't have one with him. He considered the situation to be an "extraordinary circumstance." He later asked for and received a breathing mask.

1:20 p.m. ET: Prosecutor Guy shows Raimondo a map of Zimmerman's neighborhood. Raimondo shows jurors where he entered into the complex and where he parked. He says he angled his lights on the scene because lighting was poor. It was drizzling, according to Raimondo.

1:17 p.m. ET: Raimondo says he heard the call go out for a suspicious person. The call was later upgraded to shots fired. He arrived on scene within five minutes.

1:14 p.m. ET: The prosecution calls Sergeant Anthony Raimondo to the stand. He's the training coordinator for the Sanford Police Department. He's also on the Seminole County SWAT unit. He was a patrol sergeant the night Martin was shot.

1:10 p.m. ET: The jury is now being seated.

1:09 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at the judge's bench and testimony is in a holding pattern.

1:03 p.m. ET: The defense attorneys have left to go into a conference room just outside the courtroom. The judge is on the bench and the jury has not been seated yet.

12:02 p.m. ET: O'Brien is raising his voice while he is explaining that no one ever told the neighborhood watch volunteers to follow suspicious people. The attorneys have finished their questions for O'Brien, and he has been excused. Judge Nelson has recessed court for lunch. The live blog will resume when court picks back up at 1:00 p.m. ET.

11:57 a.m. ET: O'Brien said some construction workers followed a suspicious person in the neighborhood and caught him breaking into the house. So he sent out an email to the community praising the construction workers.

11:54 a.m. ET: Prosecutor Mantei is asking O'Brien to tell jurors about how a man was caught breaking into a house in the neighborhood.

11:52 a.m. ET: O'Brien said the reason why Zimmerman was in charge of the neighborhood watch is, because he went to the police and organized it.

11:50 a.m. ET: "Everybody was supposed to watch out for their neighbors. If they see something suspicious stay away and call the police," said O'Brien.

11:48 a.m. ET: O'Brien said the neighborhood watch had nothing to do with the HOA, and Zimmerman started it on his own.

11:46 a.m. ET: The prosecution has called Donald O'Brien the president of the Homeowners Association at Twin Lakes, Zimmerman's neighborhood.

11:43 a.m. ET: Dorival said Zimmerman was charged with the duty of recruiting other volunteers for the neighborhood watch. She is now done testifying now and has been excused from the witness stand.

11:38 a.m. ET: West has finished his questioning of Dorival. Prosecutor Guy is now asking her questions on re-direct examination.

11:35 a.m. ET: The defense wants letter Zimmerman sent to the police chief complimenting Dorival's work with the neighborhood watch. The prosecution objected, and Judge Nelson ruled sustained the objection baring the letters. The jury is now being seated.

11:20 a.m. ET: Court is in recess for 10 minutes.

11:17 a.m. ET: Judge Nelson has sent the jury out of the courtroom for their morning break, while the attorneys remain at sidebar.

11:07 a.m. ET: The attorneys are still at a sidebar with the judge.

11:02 a.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

11:00 a.m. ET: West asked Dorival to explain what she tells neighborhood watch volunteers to keep an eye out for.

"If you see a car driving around in circles, and you don't recognize the car in your community that might be suspicious." said Dorival. "If people are walking around in areas that not typically walked on that could be suspicious."

10:55 a.m. ET: West has asked for a moment to confer with O'Mara.

10:53 a.m. ET: Dorival said all the police needs for the neighborhood watch to do is be its "eyes and ears."

10:49 a.m. ET: West asked Dorival if Zimmerman's behavior every raised any red flags. Dorival said no he seemed concerned and wanted to help.

10:47 a.m. ET: Dorival said acted as a "liaison" between the police and the neighborhood watch.

10:43 a.m. ET: West asked Dorival if a resident told her if there was a home invasion and robbery in the community. The prosecution objected as hearsay, and the judge sustained their objection. West reworded his question, and Dorival said yes one resident said she was traumatized by a home invasion where the perpetrator broke into her home during the day when she was home with her small child.

10:39 a.m. ET: Dorival said residents of Zimmerman's neighborhood they were concerned about robberies, and the fencing around the neighborhood.

10:37 a.m. ET: West asked Dorival if Zimmerman was respectful when he worked with her. Dorival said yes he was always respectful.

10:35 a.m. ET: Dorival said that the neighborhood home owner's association asked Zimmerman to organize its neighborhood watch.

10:32 a.m. ET: Prosecutor Guy has finished his questions for Dorival, and now defense attorney Don West is cross-examining her.

10:29 a.m. ET: Dorival said that she told the the neighborhood watch volunteers in Zimmerman's neighborhood to only call 911 when their property, liberty or when someone was in danger. They were also told to never pursue or engage suspicious people in the neighborhood.

10:25 a.m. ET: Dorival said gave a presentation on September 22, 2011 about the role of the neighborhood watch, and Zimmerman was attendance. The following slide is from that presentation.

10:22 a.m. ET: Dorival is reviewing the neighborhood watch handbook the police department hands out to volunteers.

10:20 a.m. ET: Dorival said she eventually met Zimmerman at a presentation about starting a neighborhood watch program for his neighorhood.

10:16 a.m. ET: Dorival that people participating in neighborhood watch programs should be the "eyes and ears" for the police.

10:15 a.m. ET: Rumph is finished testifying. The prosecution is calling its next witness, Wendy Dorival was a volunteer program manager for the Sanford, Florida police department in 2012, and coordinated and helped start neighborhood watch programs in the community.

10:09 a.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

10:07 a.m. ET: Rumph maintains the calls received on the 911 and non-emergency lines. She has worked for the sheriff's office for 26 years. She is explaining when 911 calls the night of the shooting connected to with the 911 system and disconnected. Multiple people in the neighborhood called 911 as a result of the shooting.

10:03 a.m. ET: The jury is seated and Ramona Rumph returns to the witness stand.

9:47 a.m. ET: Judge Nelson said she will review the case law and the tapes, and will rule on the admissibility of the evidence later. She has recessed court for 10 minutes. When court resumes the prosecution will pick back up with their case.

9:46 a.m. ET: The prosecution is playing the prior calls Zimmerman made reporting suspicious to the police in rapid succession. On one call, Zimmerman said he doesn't want to approach a suspicious man in his neighborhood.

9:44 a.m. ET: On another call, Zimmerman tells a dispatcher that there are two suspicious "African-American males" loitering in his neighborhood, and he is a member of the neighborhood watch.

9:42 a.m. ET: Zimmerman is closing his eyes as the recordings are played for the judge.

9:39 a.m. ET: On another recording, Zimmerman said he sees suspicious people run or get away most of the time, and he thinks they retreat to the next neighborhood over.

9:36 a.m. ET: The prosecution is playing Zimmerman's "prior calls" reporting suspicious people for the judge. Zimmerman can be heard telling the police about a "black" kid in his neighborhood who matches the description of someone who robbed a house in his neighborhood.

9:31 a.m. ET: "I am allowed and required actually to establish or to address the self-defense in this case. The fact in issue, relevance, pertains no to just the elements of the crime, but the elements of the defense, whether it was justifiable." said Mantei.

9:29 a.m. ET: Mantei is going over how the case law supports the prosecution's argument again.

9:27 a.m. ET: Mantei is said the defense initially agreed to the admissibility of these phone calls, and they aren't a "secret."

9:23 a.m. ET: O'Mara has finished his argument, and now prosecutor Mantei is giving a rebuttal argument.

9:20 a.m. ET: "State of mind does not negate the rules of evidence," said O'Mara.

9:16 a.m. ET: O'Mara said the prosecution can't use "prior good acts" to establish motive, and he can't find a case where that has been allowed.

9:11 a.m. ET: Part of the phone call was played for the juror Monday, before the defense objected to it. O'Mara is asking the judge to tell the jurors to ignore the call and any reference prosecutor John Guy made to it during his opening statement.

9:06 a.m. ET: "They are going to be asking this jury to make a quantum leap from good responsible citizen behavior to seething anger," said O'Mara.

9:03 a.m. ET: Defense attorney Mark O'Mara is now arguing against the admissibility of the Zimmerman's prior phone call. O'Mara said the prosecution is building a circumstantial case against his client, because they have little direct evidence this incident was second-degree murder.

9:00 a.m. ET: Zimmerman is staring straight ahead during the prosecution's argument without showing any emotion.

8:56 a.m. ET:

8:54 a.m. ET: Mantei said Zimmerman's prior phone calls reporting suspicious people shows his "building level of frustration."

8:50 a.m. ET: The prior phone call could help establish motive according to Mantei.

8:46 a.m. ET: Mantei said the phone call will help prove Zimmerman's state of mind the night of shooting. He is now supporting his argument with past case law.

8:43 a.m. ET: Prosecutor Rich Mantei is explaining to the judge why he feels the phone call Zimmerman placed in August 2011 about another allegedly suspicious person in the neighborhood is relevant to the case at hand.

8:40 a.m. ET: The attorneys are reviewing their case law now. The jurors are not in the courtroom for this hearing.

8:36 a.m. ET: The attorneys are still at a sidebar with the judge.

8:30 a.m. ET: Judge Nelson is on the bench, and the attorneys have joined her for a sidebar.

8:00 a.m. ET: Court is expected to start at 8:30 a.m. ET.

Judge Debra Nelson will hear arguments Tuesday morning about whether the jury in the George Zimmerman trial should hear about other incidents when Zimmerman reported suspicious people in his neighborhood.

The former neighborhood watch captain is charged with second-degree murder for shooting 17-year-old Trayvon Martin on Feb. 26, 2012. He told police he was pursuing the teenager because there had been a rash of crime in the area. A conflict ensued, and he says he was forced to kill Martin in self-defense.

Court ended abruptly Monday when the prosecution introduced a non-emergency call made by Zimmerman in August of 2011. He's heard reporting a different suspicious person in the neighborhood and tells the operator that the neighborhood had some break-ins recently.

Prosecutors said the call helps show Zimmerman's state of mind the night Martin was killed, but the defense questioned the call's relevance. 

Nelson asked attorneys on both sides to research the issue overnight, and to be prepared to argue their positions Tuesday morning.

The trial began Monday with opening statements that included profanity, 911 tapes and even a knock-knock joke from the defense.

"Knock, knock," defense attorney Don West said. "'Who's there?' 'George Zimmerman.' 'George Zimmerman, who?' 'All right, good, you are on the jury.'"

No one in the courtroom laughed at the joke, but West did get a few laughs when he followed it up by saying, "Nothing? That's funny."

Prosecutor Bernie De La Rionda sat at the counsel table shaking his head as the joke fell flat.

West apologized for the joke later, saying, "No more bad jokes, I promise that. I was convinced it was the delivery."

After West finished his opening statement, prosecutors began their case, calling Chad Joseph to the stand. 

The 15-year-old was playing video games with Martin the night he died, and had asked Martin to get Skittles when he left for the store.

Andrew Gaugh, the 7-Eleven cashier who sold Martin a soft drink and the Skittles, also took the stand and watched surveillance video of the transaction.

Sean Noffke, the 911 dispatcher who took Zimmerman's non-emergency call before he shot Martin, testified that he was trained to give general commands instead of direct orders to people.

When Zimmerman said he was following Martin, Noffke told him, "Okay, we don’t need you to do that." Noffke told the prosecutor he's liable for any direct orders he gives someone.

On cross-examination, defense attorney Mark O'Mara pointed out that Noffke had asked Zimmerman, "Which way is he running?"

"If you tell somebody twice to let you know if the person that they’re concerned about is doing anything else -- do you think they’re going to keep their eye on them?" asked O'Mara.

"I can’t answer that," said Noffke.

Nelson said she would review the evidence and case law and make a ruling on the admissibility of the prior phone calls later.

Court ended abruptly Monday when the prosecution introduced a non-emergency call made by Zimmerman in August of 2011. He s heard reporting a suspicious person in the neighborhood and tells the operator that the neighborhood had some break-ins recently.

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