By using this site, you agree to the Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.
Close X

Rebuttal case ends with Arias in tears

NEED TO KNOW
  • HLN is covering the Jodi Arias trial live gavel-to-gavel
  • Arias is accused of killing Travis Alexander, but she says she did it in self-defense
  • Watch 'HLN After Dark: The Jodi Arias Trial' at 10 p.m. on HLN
Rebuttal case ends with Arias in tears

Closing arguments in the Jodi Arias trial are scheduled for next Thursday and Friday. Watch HLN to see every second of the dramatic conclusion.

Prosecutor Juan Martinez rested his rebuttal case Thursday in the Jodi Arias trial with an emotional finale that elicited tears from many in the courtroom.

Martinez called Dr. Kevin Horn back to the stand to refute Arias' testimony about how she shot Alexander in the head first in self-defense, but doesn’t remember stabbing him multiple times and slitting his throat. However, she did acknowledge, while sobbing uncontrollably, that logically she must have been the person that attacked Alexander with the knife.

Horn said Alexander was stabbed first, because if Alexander was shot first he would have been incapacitated within seconds and would not have been able to fight back or walk after that injury to his brain.

Martinez asked, "When you say very rapidly incapacitating, what does that mean to those of us who not in the medical profession? Would he have gone down? Would he have stood there? Would he have crawled? What would have happened?"

"Uh, he may have been able to take a step or two, probably would have collapsed or lost consciousness within seconds," said Horn.

During Horn's testimony, Martinez displayed photos to the jury of Alexander's hands with defensive wounds indicating he was conscious enough to fight back.

Arias, along with members of Alexander's family, wept as photos of Alexander's injuries were shown to the jury.

HLN is live-blogging the Jodi Arias trial. Read about Wednesday testimony here, and Tuesday's here. Read below for minute-by-minute updates from the trial (Best read from the bottom up):

1:50 p.m. ET: Jury#8 has been dismissed from the jury panel. There's three alternates left, and there is no word on why Juror #8 was dismissed yet.

 

 

1:24 p.m. ET: Judge Stephens is meeting with the attorneys in her chambers.

1:23 p.m. ET: Horn has completed his testimony, and Martinez has rested his rebuttal case. Judge Stephens has sent the jury out of the courtroom.

1:20 p.m. ET: Juror question: How many times have you seen injuries involving a .25 caliber gun? Horn said he has seen wounds from .25 caliber guns about 200 times.

Juror question: Why do you believe Alexander was still alive when his throat was slit? Horn said he believes he was still alive at that time, because of the amount of the blood came out of that wound.

1:18 p.m. ET: Juror question: Could it be possible that you are wrong about Alexander being able to walk after the gunshot? Horn said no, he thinks there is no chance he has been wrong.

1:17 p.m. ET: Willmott has concluded her questions for Horn. Martinez is asking Horn about what happens to the brain when there's an injury to the frontal lobe. Horn said the shock wave of the bullet would have hurt other parts of the brain in addition to the frontal lobe, and it would have make the individual rapidly lose consciousness. Attorneys are now reviewing questions from the jury.

1:15 p.m. ET:

1:12 p.m. ET: Horn said he knows the bullet passed through Alexander's frontal lobe despite the fact that there was no brain for him to examine, because of decomposition.

1:09 p.m. ET: Willmott is asking Horn if he ever told Det. Esteban Flores if he thought the gunshot was first. Horn said he doesn't remember ever telling Flores that the gunshot was the first injury.

1:06 p.m. ET: Martinez has concluded his questions for Horn. Defense attorney Jennifer Willmott is now asking him questions now.

1:03 p.m. ET: Dr. Horn said that blood splatter at the crime scene indicates Alexander was able to crawl down the hall way and also stand above a sink and hover above it. Alexander would not have been able to move if the gunshot was his first injury according to Dr. Horn.

1:01 p.m. ET: Martinez: "When you say very rapidly incapacitating, what does that mean to those of us who not in the medical profession? Would he have gone down? Would he have stood there? Would he have crawled? What would have happened?"

Horn: "Uh, he may have been able to take a step or two, probably would have collapsed or lost consciousness within seconds."

1:00 p.m. ET: As Martinez shows the jury pictures of Alexander's wounds Arias appears to be crying and will not look at the photos.

12:58 p.m. ET: Horn is explaining how the gunshot wound to Alexander's head would have been rapidly incapacitated within seconds. He said Alexander would not have been able to defend himself after the gunshot wound. Martinez is showing the defensive wounds on Alexander's hands to the jury.

12:54 p.m. ET: Martinez has called Horn back to the witness stand.

12:48 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

12:44 p.m. ET: Our producer in the courtroom says members of Alexander's family are in a closed-door meeting with the prosecutor.

12:26 p.m. ET: Testimony should begin in a few minutes.

Prosecutor Juan Martinez could end his rebuttal case in the Jodi Arias trial Thursday with an emotional finale.
 
Martinez is expected to call medical examiner Kevin Horn back to the witness stand to rebut Arias' testimony of how she killed her ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander.

Photos: What the Arias jury doesn't know

Arias testified earlier that she shot Alexander in the head first in self-defense, but doesn’t remember stabbing him multiple times and slitting his throat. However, she did acknowledge, while sobbing uncontrollably, that logically she must have been the person that attacked Alexander with the knife.
 
Horn will likely testify about his autopsy of Alexander’s body, and why he believes Alexander was stabbed first and that the gunshot wound was inflicted after Alexander had already died because of a lack of hemorrhaging in the wound.    

The sequencing could become even more important later in the trial because this is a death penalty case. If the jury convicts Arias of first-degree murder and the prosecution can prove that Arias was cruel and caused Alexander to suffer, she may be sentenced to death. However, if the defense can show that Alexander was shot in the head first, attorneys can argue that all of Alexander's other wounds were inflicted after he died, so he didn't suffer. That could save Arias from the death penalty.

Watch: Was Arias pregnant with Alexander's baby?

Judge Sherry Stephens has announced that after Thursday's testimony, court will not be in session until next Wednesday, when the defense is expected to call one last witness to refute new evidence Martinez introduced during his rebuttal.

Join the conversation...

HLNtv.com welcomes a lively and courteous discussion as long as you follow the Rules of Conduct set forth in our Terms of Service. Comments are not pre-screened before they post. You agree that anything you post may be used, along with your name and profile picture, in accordance with our Privacy Policy and the license you have granted pursuant to our Terms of Service.
Anthony and Arias: Common characteristics?
Jodi Arias | See all 1189 items Anthony and Arias: Common characteristics?

Advertisement