Expert: Arias has a 'personality disorder'

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  • HLN is covering the Jodi Arias trial live gavel-to-gavel
  • Arias is accused of killing Travis Alexander, but she says she did it in self-defense
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Expert: Arias has a 'personality disorder'

When court is done for the day, the conversation is only just beginning. Watch HLN’s newest hit show "HLN After Dark: The Jodi Arias Trial" nightly at 10 p.m. on HLN.

Prosecutor Juan Martinez got his chance to go on the attack again Tuesday in the Jodi Arias trial.

At the beginning of court proceedings, the defense rested its case. Martinez then began his rebuttal case by calling clinical psychologist Janeen DeMarte to the stand.

DeMarte testified she evaluated Arias and diagnosed her with a "borderline personality disorder." She compared a person suffering from this type of disorder to an immature teenager with identity issues.

Arias displays seven of the nine characteristics of borderline personality disorder, according to DeMarte. These are the seven traits DeMarte said she observed in Arias' behavior:

1.       Efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment
2.       Unstable and intense interpersonal relationships
3.       Identity disturbance
4.       Suicidal behavior
5.       Affective instability
6.       Chronic feelings of emptiness
7.       Inappropriate, intense anger

However, Demarte said Arias does not display these characteristics: "transient, stress related paranoid ideation" and "impulsivity."

Defense attorney Jennifer Willmott will continue her cross examination of DeMarte on Wednesday.

HLN is live-blogging the Jodi Arias trial. Read about Monday's proceedings here and  LaViolette's testimony from Friday here. Read below for minute-by-minute updates from the trial. (Best read from the bottom up):

7:33 p.m. ET: Judge Stephens has recessed court until 12:30 p.m. ET: Wednesday.

7:31 p.m. ET:  DeMarte is now discussing her lectures listed on her resume with Willmott.

7:28 p.m. ET: Willmott is asking DeMarte about a research project she worked on that involved women of domestic abuse.

7:25 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining the licensing process for becoming psychologist. She says you don't become a psychologist until after an individual receives their license.

7:22 p.m. ET: Willmott asked DeMarte if perpetrators of sexual crimes tell their families about their offensive behavior hinting at Alexander's actions. DeMarte said the family can know about the behavior if they are victims, the family catches them or when the perpetrators are arrested.

7:18 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining her work experience at a state hospital during her residency. During this time, she conducted evaluations and also provided therapy with certain patients.

7:14 p.m. ET: Willmott is asking DeMarte about her knowledge of LaViolette. She pointed out that DeMarte had not been born yet when LaViolette got her Masters degree in 1980, making the point she is young.

7:11 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining a managerial role she held after she received her license to practice.

7:07 p.m. ET: Willmott is grilling DeMarte about how she learned how to conduct evaluations.

7:05 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining how she conducted evaluations for children who were victims of domestic violence. Willmott asked if she ever felt any compassion for the children she worked with, and DeMarte said at some point she did feel compassion, but remained unbiased.

7:01 p.m. ET: Arias is paying closer attention to Willmott's cross examination of DeMarte than she did with Martinez's direct examination.

6:58 p.m. ET: Willmott is walking DeMarte through her resume and work experience.

6:56 p.m. ET: Willmott is asking DeMarte why she waited a year to get her license after she got her Ph.d.

6:52 p.m. ET: Martinez has wrapped his direct examination of DeMarte. Defense attorney Willmott is asking DeMarte questions on cross examination now.

6:49 p.m. ET: DeMarte is walking Martinez through the symptoms for battered woman syndrome, and Arias did not display any of those symptoms.

1.       Tendency to re-experience
2.       Tendency to avoid
3.       Tendency to have increased arousal
4.       Impaired social relationships
5.       Batterer controls movements
6.       Many medical problems and compliants

6:47 p.m. ET: DeMarte said she does not believe Arias endured abuse from Alexander, because she was inconsistent with her stories when it came to Alexander's alleged abuse.

6:45 p.m. ET: Martinez asked DeMarte to explain "battered woman syndrome." DeMarte said "battered woman syndrome" is when someone displays behaviors normally experienced by an individual who has suffered from domestic violence.

6:44 p.m. ET: DeMarte said she has also worked with children who were victims of domestic violence.

6:41 p.m. ET: DeMarte has worked with victims of domestic abuse and perpetrators of the abuse.

6:38 p.m ET: Martinez asked DeMarte to list all of her experiences she has had working with victims of domestic violence.

6:36 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining how a fight or flight response affects the brain and causes memory lapses. She says this memory happens for only brief moments during the trauma and does not last four hours like Arias has described.

6:34 p.m. ET:

6:31 p.m. ET:

6:29 p.m. ET: DeMarte said Arias engaged in multiple complex behaviors after killing Alexander, and she would not have been able to do that if she was experiencing a fight or flight response.

6:26 p.m. ET: DeMarte said there is some memory impairment when some experiences a fight or flight response, but it is not as long as Arias is reporting. The attorneys are now at another sidebar.

6:22 p.m. ET:

6:20 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

6:17 p.m. ET: The judge is back on the bench, and the jury is being seated.

6:00 p.m. ET: Judge Stephens has recessed court until 6:15 p.m. ET.

5:56 p.m. ET: DeMarte said people who find themselves in dangerous situations and have a flight or fight reaction can have memory proples. She began to explain why she did not see any fight or flight behavior's in Arias case, but defense attorney Willmott object and now the attorneys are at a sidebar.

5:53 p.m. ET: Martinez asked DeMarte about Arias' memory gaps from the night of the killing again, and how the flight and fight reaction applies to memory loss.

5:50 p.m. ET: So far, Arias only displays one symptom of PTSD, according to DeMarte, Arias experienced a traumatic event when she killed Alexander.

5:46 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking how Arias' actions of having a romantic encounter with Ryan Burns the day after killing Alexander fits in with her diagnosis that Arias suffers from PTSD. DeMarte said people suffering from a personality disorder can quickly switch between idolizing and devaluing people and her behavior shortly after killing Alexander is an example of that.

5:41 p.m. ET: DeMarte said Arias' alleged memory loss is atypical and doesn't seem plausible, because usually someone with memory gaps as big of Arias' must suffer from a physical injury. Arias did not suffer from a physical injury to her head during the struggle.

DeMarte: "When people are exposed to traumatic events, most people have an acute memory of what the traumatic event is. But there are times when there is traumatic events that they lose aspects of what happened."

Martinez: "Is this something that the defendant manifested?"

DeMarte: "She’s reporting to have lost a significant amount of time associated with the killing."

Martinez: "So does she, just based on her statements alone, does she meet this criteria?"

DeMarte: "Purely based on her report of it alone, that answer would be yes."

Martinez: "Yes or no that she meets that criteria?"

DeMarte: "Based on my knowledge of how memories typically form, surrounding traumatic events, I would not agree that she meets this criteria. Based on her report of it, yes."

Martinez: "Based on your schooling and experience, you do not believe that she meets these? That’s right?"

DeMarte: "That’s correct."

Martinez: "Tell me why."

DeMarte: "Well, related to traumatic memories, specifically, as I highlighted earlier, when people experience a traumatic event, it’s not like our day-to-day events that we have. It’s hard to remember what we ate for breakfast a week ago or what we wore, that’s different with traumatic events. When they occur, they tend to stand out in our mind more which is part of why we see the development disorders that we see. But there are times that people can become hyper vigilant and focused on only aspects of memory loss. The reason I don’t believe the case with Ms. Arias because of the way she is reporting the memory loss is not consistent with what you consistently see."

5:37 p.m. ET: DeMarte said Arias did not display the PTSD trait, "avoidance of anything related to the trauma."

5:33 p.m. ET: Here are the four symptoms of PTSD, according to DeMarte.

A. Experienced a traumatic event - DeMarte said killing Alexander would meet this category.
B. Re-experience of trauma - DeMarte said Arias did not display this trait.
C. Avoidance of anything related to the trauma - DeMarte said Arias did not display this trait.
D. Increased arousal - DeMarte said Arias did not display this trait.

5:27 p.m. ET:

5:25 p.m. ET: DeMarte said if the event that caused the trauma ended up not being true, it would invalidate a diagnosis of PTSD.

5:20 p.m. ET: DeMarte is now walking the jury through the symptoms of PTSD.

5:17 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking DeMarte about Arias' inappropriate and intense anger. DeMarte is reading a portion of an email Arias wrote on February 14, 2007, where she discusses her anger issues.

5:12 p.m. ET: Attorneys are reviewing materials right now. In the meantime to recap, DeMarte testified Arias displays 8 of the 9 characteristics of borderline personality disorder. These are the eight traits she says Arias displays:

1.       Efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment
2.       Unstable and intense interpersonal relationships
3.       Identity disturbance
4.       Suicidal behavior
5.       Affective instability
6.       Chronic feelings of emptiness
7.       Inappropriate, intense anger

However, Demarte said Arias does not display these characteristics: "transient, stress related paranoid ideation" and "impulsivity."

5:11 p.m. ET: DeMarte said she did not find that Arias displays the ninth trait of borderline personality disorder: "transient, stress related paranoid ideation." That means someone displays paranoid behavior when experiencing stress according to DeMarte. She also said she does not agree with Samuels' diagnosis that Arias suffers for PTSD.

5:05 p.m. ET:

 

 

5:04 p.m. ET: The attorneys are still at a sidebar, but here at the traits of personality disorder DeMarte says Arias displays so far (she may provide more after the sidebar):

1.       Efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment
2.       Unstable and intense interpersonal relationships
3.       Identity disturbance
4.       Impulsivity
5.       Suicidal behavior
6.       Affective instability
7.       Chronic feelings of emptiness
8.       Inappropriate, intense anger

4:55 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

4:54 p.m. ET: DeMarte is showing the jury an example of Arias' intense inappropriate behavior that is another trait of a personality disorder.

4:51 p.m. ET: DeMarte said people with personality disorders usually have rapid mood swings, are suicidal, and feelings of emptiness. She said she saw materials that indicate Arias displayed all three of those traits.

4:48 p.m. ET:

4:46 p.m. ET: People with a personality disorder will shift their identity when around different people. DeMarte said Arias displayed this trait when she converted to the Mormon Faith within a couple months of meeting Alexander.

4:44 p.m. ET: Martinez is writing down the characteristics someone displays when they suffer from borderline personality disorder.

4:41 p.m. ET: DeMarte is now walking Martinez through the official definition of borderline personality disorder.

4:38 p.m. ET:

4:37 p.m. ET: DeMarte said she diagnosed Arias with borderline personality disorder. She compares the disorder to a immature teenager with identity issues.

4:35 p.m. ET: DeMarte said Arias test scores were consistent with someone suffering from a borderline personality disorder. She also said she gave Arias an IQ test, because she found some of her behaviors were very immature.

4:30 p.m. ET: DeMarte is back on the witness stand. The attorneys are at a sidebar.

2:56 p.m. ET: DeMarte said Arias personality test results indicate she is aggressive, but good at hiding it on a day-to-day basis. People with her general profile are also good at placing blame on others. Judge Stephens has recessed court for lunch. The live blog will pick back up when testimony resumes at 4:30 p.m. ET.

2:54 p.m. ET: DeMarte said the personality test Arias took had validity scales that allows the evaluator to know if the results are valid or if the test taker was lying.

2:51 p.m. ET: The personality test Arias took has over 500 questions, and the questions have multiple choice answers.

2:47 p.m. ET: DeMarte said the personality test Arias took tests for traits like aggressiveness.

2:40 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at sidebar with the judge now.

2:38 p.m. ET: Arias scored a 119 on the IQ test. DeMarte said she also administered a personality test during her evaluation of Arias.

Martinez: So what the, her overall score or IQ score?

Demarte: She scored relatively high, above average range.

Martinez: And what was that score, do you know?

Demarte: May I reference my records?

Martinez: Sure.

Defense attorney Willmott: Judge, I’m going to object. Not rebuttal.

Judge Stephens: Overruled.

Martinez: Take a look at exhibit 621, review it, once you have reviewed it, please give it back. What was the overall IQ score?

Demarte: Overall IQ was 119.

Martinez: And did she achieve a score on any of these four domains that in the very superior range?

Demarte: Yes, the first domain that I described, verbal comprehension.

Martinez: And what did she score there?

Demarte: I believe it’s 136.

Martinez: Uh, take a look at it, okay. And, when you say that is very superior, what does that mean?

Willmott: Objection, not rebuttable.

Judge Stephens: Overruled.

Demarte: It’s the highest possible that you can get in terms of descriptor domains, it’s very high.

2:35 p.m. ET: DeMarte gave Arias an IQ test., and Arias scored above average on the test. She showed no signs of having any issues with her memory.

2:33 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining the different tests she gave to Arias during her evaluation.

2:30 p.m. ET: LaViolette testified earlier in the trial that she didn't believe Alexander was scared of Arias' alleged stalking behavior. DeMarte said Alexander's words written to another woman should be taken as objective data, and should not be subjectively dismissed. The attorneys are now at a sidebar.

2:27 p.m. ET: DeMarte said LaViolette reviewed records and interviewed Arias. She said LaViolette should have administered tests to Arias, because it would have provided objective data.

2:24 p.m. ET: DeMarte began to explain LaViolette's evaluation process. Defense attorney Jennifer Willmott objected, and now the attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

2:23 p.m. ET: DeMarte siad the MCMI is scored and compared against a population of people who have already deemed to have psychological disorders. She also said because it is scored against a population of people with psychological disorders she would not use the test in this case.

2:20 p.m. ET: Martinez is now asking DeMarte about the other PTSD test administered to Arias during his evaluation. This other test is called the MCMI.

2:18 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

2:15 p.m. ET: Martinez is walking DeMarte through how Samuels scored the PSD test. Samuels testified he rescored the test multiple times. DeMarte said she has no idea why someone would need to rescore a test like the PSD three times if it wasn't scored correctly or if someone was trying manipulate the data.

2:11 p.m. ET: DeMarte says there is multiple issues with the PSD Samuels administered to Arias and that is is why it is invalid.

2:09 p.m. ET: Our producer in the courtroom says the jury has not submitted any questions for this witness so far.

2:07 p.m. ET:

2:05 p.m. ET: DeMarte said if Arias lied about the triggering traumatic event on the PSD it proves nothing other than Arias lied on the test. The attorneys are now at a sidebar with the judge.

2:03 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining how it is possible to lie to PSD and invalidate on the test.

1:59 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking how Samuels tested Arias for PTSD, and how the PSD test works.

1:57 p.m. ET: DeMarte said she Arias wrote on one test she had sexual concerns in January 2007 about her relationship with Alexander.

1:55 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining why she chose to give Arias certain psychological examines during her evaluation.

1:51 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking DeMarte about the how Arias told different psychologists different stories of the physical abuse she endured at the hands of Alexander.

Martinez: "In terms of Sheryl Carp, how many events did she indicate to Ms. Carp in terms of this physical abuse?"

DeMarte: "I can’t even count. There was numerous reports of frequent abuse and threatened behavior."

Martinez: "But there was also events of physical abuse. Were they more or less than what she reported to you?"

DeMarte: "She reported significantly more to Dr. Carp than she did to me."

Martinez: "And with regard to the report to Dr. Carp, was that in the form of a document? Or was it during the clinical interview that she provided to her?"

DeMarte: "It was part of testing."

Martinez: "So this test where she reported this elevated or significant abuse, what is that test called?"

DeMarte: "I believe it’s called the Partner Abuse Scale. I would have to review my records to be certain."

Martinez: "As a result of the Partner Abuse Scale, and as a result of this reporting, in your opinion, did you see what opinion Dr. Carp reached with regard to the defendant? What was her opinion as to whether or not this was PTSD?"

DeMarte: "She concluded Ms. Arias had PTSD as a result of the alleged abuse."

1:45 p.m. ET: The attorneys are still at a sidebar.

1:36 p.m. ET: DeMarte said she spent 12 hours interviewing Arias during her evaluation. She said asked Arias about her childhood, sexual experiences, and her relationship with Alexander. The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

1:33 p.m. ET: DeMarte said she would never give gifts to a person she is evaluating, because it could alter the relationship between the individual and the evaluator. LaViolette and Samuels both testified they gave Arias reading materials for her to review when she was in jail.

1:31 p.m. ET: Arias is reading something and taking lots of notes this morning.

1:29 p.m. ET:

1:28 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

1:27 p.m. ET: LaViolette testified earlier in the trial that she apologized to Arias when she first met her. DeMarte said an evaluator should never be compassionate for the individual you are evaluating them because the results will not be accurate. The results will be biased.

1:24 p.m. ET: DeMarte said it is extreme for a psychologist to spend 40 hours evaluating a client, because it could become treatment. 

1:22 p.m ET:

1:20 p.m. ET: Martinez asked DeMarte if there is pyschology class about the "Law of Attraction." She said no there is no class taught on the "Law of Attraction" at any school.

1:16 p.m. ET: DeMarte said it is important for a psychologist to not go into an forensic evaluation with a hypothesis, because they will not consider other possibilities. This is a jab at how psychologist Richard Samuels had the hypothesis that Arias had PTSD, before he ever evaluated her.

1:13 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining how she conducts she conducts a clinical psychological evaluation in a forensic setting.

1:11 p.m. ET: DeMarte said she visited Arias in jail to evaluate her. Martinez is asking her LaViolette's education and experience. DeMarte said LaViolette just has her masters in couple's counseling.

1:08 p.m. ET: DeMarte is explaining how she became a licensed psychologist.

1:04 p.m. ET: Prosecutor Martinez's first rebuttal witness will be clinical psychologist Janeen DeMarte. Martinez is walking DeMarte's education and clinical experience.

1:03 p.m. ET: Attorney Kirk Nurmi announced the defense has rested its case.

1:01 p.m. ET: The jury is being seated.

12:59 p.m. ET: The judge is on the bench and the attorneys have joined her for a sidebar.

12:35 p.m. ET: Our producer in the courtroom says Judge Sherry Stephens has asked to meet with the attorneys in chambers.

12:26 p.m. ET: Court should start in a few minutes. The defense is expected to rest its at the start of today's proceedings.

After 10 witnesses and 38 days of testimony, Jodi Arias’ defense team rested its case Tuesday .

Only time will tell if her defense attorneys were able to establish reasonable doubts in the minds of the jurors and save Arias’ life.

Watch: Arias, Alexander family forced to separate in court

Arias is on trial for killing her ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander on June 4, 2008. If convicted, she could face the death penalty. Arias testified earlier in the trial that Alexander’s physical and sexual abuse culminated in a fight that forced her to kill him in self-defense.

Prosecutor Juan Martinez will get another crack at presenting evidence in his rebuttal case if the defense rests Tuesday. Martinez is expected to call multiple witnesses to the stand, including a psychologist, a Wal-Mart employee and a couple of Alexander’s former co-workers.

Read more: Arias' defense takes closer look at shower photo

Domestic violence expert Alyce LaViolette, who has supported the defense's claim that Alexander was abusive and battered Arias, may also return to court Tuesday for an unknown issue.

On Monday, attorneys reached an agreement that will mean the defense’s last witness Bryan Neumeister will not testify. The defense wanted Neumeister to testify about his forensic photography analysis of a photo taken of Alexander moments before he died. In hearing outside of the presence of the jury Monday, Neumeister testified reflected in Alexander’s eye is an image of someone with both hands on a camera without a gun or a knife.

Martinez said he just sees a dog in a digitally enhanced image: “I saw some ears and then I saw a snout.”

The attorneys reached an agreement Monday, and instead of Neumeister testifying the following statement will be read to the jury:

"Ms. Arias was not holding a knife or gun in her hands when exhibit 159 (the photo of Alexander in the shower moments before he died) was taken. That photograph was taken on June 4, 2008 at 5:29:20."

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