Expert: Jodi Arias wrote a 'manifesto'

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Alyce LaViolette

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Domestic violence expert Alyce LaViolette testified Monday that Jodi Arias wrote a manifesto and autographed a couple copies of the book after being arrested for killing her ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander.

Prosector Juan Martinez wanted to know how LaViolette reconciled her belief that Arias has a low self-esteem with her knowledge that Arias was confident enough to write a manifesto and thinks she is as smart as Albert Einstein.

Martinez asked, "So the fact that the defendant was happy to have her IQ tested, because she believed she’s on the level of Einstein, doesn’t indicate to you this individual does not suffer from a low self-esteem issue?"

"Most people who talk about how smart they are don’t feel that they are that smart or they’re really interested as, by the way, I did do testing as an undergraduate. When I did my practice tests, people were very interested in their IQ because it’s interesting. So, there could be a number of reasons why she was excited about that. I don’t know, I wasn’t there," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "Well, but the bottom line is you had it in your notes, right? You read that. Correct?"

"Yes, I did," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "And, you’re saying that, well, all these other people have these reasons why they want to know what their IQ is, you don’t know why that’s why the defendant wanted to know about her IQ right?"

"No, I don’t," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "Because you didn’t ask her right?"

"No, I didn’t," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked "And it could be she has a very high self-esteem and she believes it and this is going to be confirmation for her."

Defense attorney Jennifer Willmott objected, saying Martinez's question called for speculation, but Judge Sherry Stephens overruled the objection.

 

HLN is live-blogging the Jodi Arias trial. Read about LaViolette's testimony from Thursday, here, her fifth day on the stand here, her fourth day here, her third day here, her second here and her first moments on the witness stand here. Read below for minute-by-minute updates from the trial. (Best read from the bottom up):

7:45 p.m. ET: We have learned that the defense filed a motion for a mistrial based on prosecutorial misconduct.

7:26 p.m. ET: LaViolette said a woman named Amy told her that Arias had her print out the last two pages of her manifesto so she could sign it in case she became famous. Judge Stephens has recessed court for the day.

7:24 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

7:21 p.m. ET: LaViolette is taking the stand, and the jury is being seated.

7:20 p.m. ET:

7:16 p.m. ET: The judge has sent the jury out of the room for a few minutes as the attorneys discuss something with her at a sidebar.

7:13 p.m. ET: LaViolette is reviewing her notes, while the attorneys are at a sidebar.

7:12 p.m. ET:

7:09 p.m. ET: LaViolette wrote in her notes that Arias took a psychological examination and tested normal in the self image category. The attorneys are now at a sidebar.

7:07 p.m. ET: LaViolette is reviewing some of her notes.

7:06 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

7:05 p.m. ET:

7:03 p.m. ET: LaViolette admitted she wrote in her notes that Arias wrote a manifesto to distribute if she became famous. She also said she did not mean that the fact Arias wrote a manifesto means she had high self esteem. Martinez said Arias autographed copies of the manifesto while in jail in Yreka, California.

7:01 p.m. ET: Martinez just brought what he calls a manifesto that Arias wrote. The attorneys are now at a sidebar.

6:59 p.m. ET: Martinez said Arias was happy to have her IQ tested, because she was as smart as Albert Einstein. He asked LaViolette if that she thinks she is that smart if she could have low esteem. LaViolette said esteem has to do with other things not just IQ.

Martinez asked, "So the fact that the defendant was happy to have her IQ tested because she believed she’s on the level of Einstein, doesn’t indicate to you this individual does not suffer from a low self-esteem issue?"

"Most people who talk about how smart they are don’t feel that they are that smart or they’re really interested as, by the way, I did do testing as an undergraduate. When I did my practice tests people were very interested in their IQ because it’s interesting. So, there could be a number of reasons why she was excited about that. I don’t know, I wasn’t there," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "Well, but the bottom line is you had it in your notes, right? You read that. Correct?"

"Yes, I did," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "And, you’re saying that, well, all these other people have these reasons why they want to know what their IQ is, you don’t know why that’s why the defendant wanted to know about her IQ right?"

"No, I don’t," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "Because you didn’t ask her right?"

"No, I didn’t," said LaViolette.

Martinez, asked "And it could be she has a very high self-esteem and she believes it and this is going to be confirmation for her."

Defense attorney Jennifer Willmott said, "Objection, speculation."

Judge Sherry Stephens overruled Willmott.

6:56 p.m. ET: Martinez asked LaViolette if she is biased towards Arias again. LaViolette said her positive feelings did not affect her ability to look at objective materials.

6:55 p.m. ET: LaViolette said she had a good feeling about Arias after meeting with her for the first time. Their first meeting was eight hours long.

6:54 p.m. ET:

6:51 p.m. ET: Martinez asked LaViolette if someone to force her to apologize to Arias when he met her. LaViolette said no, no one forced her to apologize, and she didn't have to do it, but it was the respectful thing to do.

6:48 p.m. ET: LaViolette said she crafts the way she crafts her evaluation tactics for each client.

6:46 p.m. ET:

6:43 p.m. ET: Martinez wants to know if there was another way LaViolette could have built rapport with Arias. LaViolette said she is the one that gets to decide how she builds rapport.

6:42 p.m. ET: LaViolette said she apologized to Arias, because she felt like she invaded Arias' personal matters.

6:41 p.m. ET:

6:39 p.m. ET: LaViolette apologized to Arias when she met her for the first time. Martinez asked her if she apologized to Arias because she had sympathy for Arias. LaViolette said she apologized to establish a rapport with Arias, because she had read Arias' most private moments in her journals, emails and texts.

6:36 p.m. ET: Martinez asked LaViolette is biased in favor of the defendant. LaViolette said she does not believe she is biased.

6:34 p.m. ET: LaViolette is taking the stand, and the jury is being seated.

6:28 p.m. ET: Testimony should begin any minute.

6:00 p.m. ET: The judge has recessed court until 6:15 p.m. ET.

5:59 p.m. ET: LaViolette said in her opinion Arias did not display a pattern of lying, and she would have investigated certain things more if she had thought Arias was lying to her.

5:56 p.m. ET:

5:54 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking LaViolette about a text message Arias sent to Alexander that was meant for another man. The attorneys are now at a sidebar.

5:51 p.m. ET:

5:48 p.m. ET: LaViolette is reviewing another text message from Alexander.

5:45 p.m. ET: Alexander wrote this about Arias' Ruby Tuesday story, "You insult me by believing I will believe such crap."

5:42 p.m. ET: Martinez is showing the jury a text message Alexander sent to Arias telling her that he wasn't going to believe her story that someone came into Ruby Tuesday and told her he was cheating on her. The attorneys are at a sidebar.

5:38 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

5:36 p.m. ET: Martinez wants LaViolette to admit that Arias was lying about the Applebee's or the Ruby Tuesday story. However, LaViolette did say she doesn't know if it's the stories are true.

5:33 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking LaViolette whether she thinks the similarities in these stories is strange. LaViolette says she would need clarification.

5:30 p.m. ET: The document shows that Arias testified that in another relationship two women approached her when she was working at Applebee's and told her that her boyfriend Matt McCartney was cheating on her. He asked if this raised a red flag, because the stories are very similar to the Ruby Tuesday story where another woman came into the restaurant told her Alexander was cheating on her. LaViolette said this is the first she has heard about the Applebee's story.

Martinez asked, "Doesn’t it seem strange - well, doesn’t it raise a red flag to you - let me do it this way, defendant has had four significant relationships, correct?"

"Correct," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "One of them is Bobby Juarez, correct?"

"Yes," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, Matthew McCartney?"

"Correct," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "Daryl Brewer?"

"Yes," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "And Travis Alexander, right?"

"Yes," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "Doesn’t it raise a red flag to you that in in 50% of those, two of the four, somebody would come in, a female would come in to the place where the defendant was working and tell her about her boyfriend being unfaithful?"

Defense attorney Willmott said, "Objection, may we approach please?"

Judge Stephens said, "Yes."

5:27 p.m. ET:

5:24 p.m. ET: Now LaViolette is reviewing the document.

5:22 p.m. ET: The defense is reviewing a document Martinez wants to admit into evidence.

5:21 p.m. ET:

5:19 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

5:17 p.m. ET: Martinez just asked LaViolette if she was biased against Alexander. LaViolette said she is not biased, and he is mischaracterized what she said.

5:15 p.m. ET: Judge Stephens just admonished LaViolette for volunteering information, and told her to answer Martinez's questions.

5:12 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking LaViolette about how Arias told her that when she was working at a Ruby Tuesday, a woman came into the restaurant and told Arias that Alexander had a long relationship with Alexander. Martinez is pointing out how Arias could of have been lying.

5:09 p.m. ET:

5:07 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

5:05 p.m. ET: Martinez made the point that police officers and investigators can be wrong.

5:02 p.m. ET: LaViolette said someone else could interpret evidence differently than her. Martinez called her the gatekeeper who decides what evidence is to believe and not believed.

5:00 p.m. ET: LaViolette is telling Martinez that she is a psychoanalyst, but Martinez is saying she doesn't do any testing and doesn't collect any data. He says all she does is give her opinion like a counselor.

4:58 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

4:56 p.m. ET: Arias is listening closely as Martinez asks LaViolette question after question. She even seemed to have a smirk at one point.

4:53 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking if LaViolette's opinion is subjective. LaViolette said she is no more subjective than a police officer or an investigator, and no one is 100% objective.

Martinez asked, "Your approach to these cases is subjective isn’t it? It’s what you believe?"

"I try to make it as objective as I can by using evidence Mr. Martinez," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "I understand that you try, but it is still sort of a subjective approach, isn’t it?"


"Probably not any more subjective than any investigation with a police officer or anybody else. You take the evidence that you have and you weigh that evidence based on a lot of things. And so, I don’t think there’s anybody who has a purely objective view. And so I would say that if you’re a police officer, you bring that to the table. If you’re an attorney you bring that to the table. Your view to the table. And so yes, in that way I bring my view to the table," said LaViolette.

4:52 p.m. ET:

4:50 p.m. ET: Martinez is comparing the analysis she did to evaluate "Snow White" to what she did in the Arias case. He made the point that she did not interview many of the people in the Arias just like how she couldn't interview the seven dwarves.

4:49 p.m. ET: Judge Stephens told LaViolette to answer the questions and not to volunteer information.

4:47 p.m. ET: Martinez is grilling LaViolette about her presentation about how "Snow White" could be considered a battered woman. LaViolette said the presentation was about gender, and Martinez is taking it out of context.

4:44 p.m. ET:

4:41 p.m. ET: The judge just announced court will not be held April 22, because a juror has another engagement.

4:39 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

4:32 p.m. ET: LaViolette is on the stand, and the trial is being seated.

4:31 p.m. ET: Testimony should begin any minute.

3:05 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking LaViolette if she has chosen not to believe what Alexander wrote about being scared of Arias, because of her stalking behavior. LaViolette said the answer is "yes with a qualifier." The judge has recessed court for lunch. The live blog will pick back up when testimony resumes at 4:25 p.m. ET.

3:01 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

2:58 p.m. ET: LaViolette is reviewing the instant message conversation between Alexander and another woman to determine if they were being flirtatious with each other.

2:54 p.m. ET: Martinez is pointing out that during this instant message conversation whether Alexander called Arias a stalker. LaViolette said Alexander did call Arias a stalker and did discuss the alleged stalking behavior with this other woman.

2:53 p.m. ET: LaViolette said she never saw any medical records from the woman who claimed to have anorexia, and she never saw a photo of her or interviewed her. Martinez is making the point that LaViolette is just picking and choosing what she wants to believe.

2:51 p.m. ET: In the portion of an instant message conversation the woman tells Alexander she suffered from anorexia. Martinez just pointed out in another conversation that Alexander didn't ask for nude photos of a woman, like LaViolette accused him of doing, but in fact he just asked for bikini shots. LaViolette admitted that was true but he requested close to nude photos.

2:48 p.m. ET: Martinez showed LaViolette a portion of a conversation between Alexander and a woman that LaViolette said was vulnerable. The attorneys are at a sidebar.

2:46 p.m. ET: The attorneys are at a sidebar.

2:45 p.m. ET:

2:43 p.m. ET: Martinez showed the jury a copy of the court's transcript that shows LaViolette discussing the importance of non-verbal communication. He asked LaViolette if she was a human lie detector? LaViolette said Martinez was mischaracterizing her statements.

Martinez said, "The question is asked why is that important to you, Ms. LaViolette. Do you see that?"

"Yes," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "And the answer is, “It’s important to me because there is a saying, I don’t know if all of the world, but in the clinical world, 90% of all communication is nonverbal,” Did you say that? Yes or no?"

"Yes I did," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "And then there is a sentence that says, “And that’s one of the things that we are looking at is apparently the communication between Mr. Alexander and although he says it’s okay for her to date.” And then it goes on, right?"

"Yes and it is in the context that also personal communi- personal, face to face communication between Mr. Alexander and Ms. Arias," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "I know that is what you want to tell us but in terms of 598, it does say, “I don’t know if all of the world, but in the clinical world, 90% of all communication is nonverbal.” That’s what it says right"

"Yes," said LaViolette.

Martinez asked, "And if we are applying that to the conversation involving [another woman] and to Mr. Alexander that you told us about last Thursday, that would mean that you were 90% wrong because there was no, you were not able to look at the nonverbal communication, were you?"

"That’s quite an extrapolation Mr. Martinez," said LaViolette.

2:36 p.m. ET: 

2:34 p.m. ET: LaViolette just read a document with a quote from her earlier testimony where she said in the clinical world is 90% of communication is non-verbal. LaViolette said the qoute is being taken out of context. The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

2:30 p.m. ET: Martinez asked LaViolette why she doesn't think interviews are important when she said in the clinical world 90% of communication is non-verbal.

2:27 p.m. ET: Martinez wants to know if LaViolette needs to conduct her own independent interviews in order to render an opinion on a case. LaViolette said she looked at other materials including texts and emails and other evidence to form her opinion.

2:25 p.m. ET:

2:23 p.m. ET: Martinez has moved back to asking LaViolette about how she used her abuse continuum to evaluate Arias. 

2:20 p.m. ET: Martinez is showing the schedule of the conference that mentions her address and it does not say anything about her being a break out keynote speaker.

2:19 p.m. ET: Martinez said the schedule of the conference said someone else was the keynote speaker, and asked LaViolette if she was a keynote speaker. LaViolette said it was a break out keynote address she gave. 

2:12 p.m. ET: On LaViolette's curriculum vitae it says she gave a keynote speech about "Snow White" being abused in Las Angeles in 2010. Now Martinez is admitting a schedule of the conference into evidence. The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

2:08 p.m. ET: Martinez is now showing LaViolette a copy of her curriculum vitae. He seems to says something is inaccurate about it. The attorneys are at a sidebar with the judge.

2:06 p.m. ET: Martinez is now asking LaViolette about her presentation about how whether "Snow White" was a battered woman.

2:05 p.m. ET: Martinez and LaViolette are going back and forth on whether she used the continuum in her evaluation of Arias. Martinez wants to know if she did not use it in the case then why did she use it in court.

2:03 p.m. ET: LaViolette said she used it in her evaluation of the case, but not as a diagnostic tool. She says she uses it as a training tool.

2:01 p.m. ET: Martinez is asking LaViolette whether she uses her abuse continuum chart to determine if someone is a domestic violence relationship.

1:58 p.m. ET: The judge asked the jury if Juror 5 had contacted them over the weekend, and no one said Juror 5 contacted them.

1:55 p.m. ET: LaViolette is taking the stand, and the jury is being seated.

1:39 p.m. ET: The parties have come out for the judge's chambers, and testimony should resume shortly.

1:38 p.m. ET: From our producer in the courtroom: Defense witness Alyce LaViolette has emerged from chambers, but the prosecutor went in, and now the judge has summoned members of Alexander's family.  So all players in chambers except for LaViolette.

1:17 p.m. ET: From our producer in the courtroom: Prosecutor Juan Martinez is in the courtroom, but defense team is not.

12:56 p.m ET: From our producer in the courtroom: Arias has emerged from her holding cell and has disappeared into the back of the courtroom with her attorneys. No word on how long this conference with the judge will take.

12:49 p.m. ET: From our producer in the courtroom: No sign of Jodi in the courtroom - it looks like this morning's session is starting in chambers. No word on how long they'll be behind closed doors.

12:40 p.m. ET: Testimony should begin any minute.

Prosecutor Juan Martinez’s feisty courtroom style during the Jodi Arias trial has had its fans and its critics, but one thing is for certain: Martinez is not letting up when it comes to domestic violence expert Alyce LaViolette. Last week, LaViolette didn’t back down when Martinez got worked up at one point. She asked him point blank if he was mad at her, causing the courtroom to erupt in laughter.

Critics say that if Martinez doesn’t control his temper, it may alienate the jury and hurt his chances of securing a guilty verdict.

Watch: Arias as a bridesmaid

LaViolette will have to face more questions from Martinez this week. He's trying to discredit her opinion that Arias' ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander physically and sexually abused Arias, which culminated in a fight, forcing Arias to kill him in self-defense.

Martinez made his first attempt to discredit LaViolette Thursday, when he brought up a presentation she gave a few years ago about how the fairy tale character Snow White is a battered woman. He accused her of being able to find abuse in situations she knows little about, including "myths."

Get caught up: Week 14 of the Arias trial

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