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Loved ones fight for new law to honor dead mother

NEED TO KNOW
  • Genna Ayup, 27, was shot & killed in front of her son
  • Manslaughter charges against Ayup's boyfriend were later dropped due to insufficient evidence
  • Ayup's loved ones are fighting for a new law in her honor
Loved ones fight for new law to honor dead mother

Genna Ayup, a 27-year-old mother, was tragically shot and killed in front of her 2 ½ year old son at her Tucson home on June 26, and nearly five months later her family is fighting for a new state law to honor her memory.

Two weeks after the shooting, Ayup’s boyfriend, Ronald James Corbin Jr., was charged with one count of manslaughter. However, the dead mother’s family and friends were stunned and outraged when the Pima County Attorney’s Office dropped the charges against Corbin a few weeks later citing insufficient evidence, KGUN-TV reported.

The Pima County Attorney’s Office did not return calls seeking a comment.  

“When I found out they had dropped the manslaughter charges, I was in complete shock and panic,” Ayup’s best friend Rachel Smith told HLN in August. “I couldn’t believe there would be no justice for Genna.”

On the day of the shooting, Corbin was at a bar from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. where he allegedly consumed between three and four 23-ounce draft beers before driving home on his motorcycle, police said in court documents.

Roughly twenty minutes later Ayup was shot, according to investigators. Police said Corbin was “installing a rubber grip on his Glock 27 handgun when it discharged and struck the victim in the head,” the documents stated. 

Corbin stated at his initial court appearance that he was about eight feet away from Ayup when the gun he was holding accidently went off, Tucson News Now reported

While court documents state police said Corbin consumed alcohol on the day of the shooting, KGUN-TV reported authorities never conducted a sobriety test.

“Because there is no law that required police to conduct a breathalyzer or blood test for drugs or alcohol on Genna’s boyfriend that evening, there was no evidence for the case to prove that he was in fact under the influence of substances,” Smith told HLN.

“No one should handle a weapon after drinking,” she said.

Now, Ayup's family and friends are seeking supporters to help pass “Genna’s Law,” which would permit police to conduct sobriety tests on people who fire a gun after consuming alcohol in the State of Arizona. 

A proposed copy of “Genna’s Law,” obtained by KGUN-TV, provides that:

  1. A person who discharges a firearm while intoxicated with a blood alcohol content of .08 or above is guilty of criminal negligence in the discharge of a firearm.
  2. A person who discharges a firearm with a blood alcohol content of .08 or more and causes injury is subject to an assessment of his or her blood alcohol.
  3. A person who discharges a firearm while intoxicated with a blood alcohol content level of .08 and causes bodily injury is subject to prosecution for negligent homicide, or aggravated assault or discharge of a weapon with negligence causing injury.
  4. Any person convicted of any offenses in 13-3107 (unlawful discharge of firearms) will be noted as a prohibited possessor in the State of Arizona and will relinquish their rights to a firearm for a period of no less than 5 years.

“This is a huge step in honoring Genna so that another family doesn’t experience what that last five months have been for us. We aren’t giving up any time soon,” Smith said.

HLN was unable to reach Corbin for a comment.

 

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