Battleground Colorado: Ready for it to be over

NEED TO KNOW
  • HLN takes a look at the life of a swing state voter
  • With so much pressure on its 9 electoral votes, Colorado is one of the key battleground states in this election
  • Republican Colorado voter Alison Sorkin says it’s a heavy responsibility to be a swing state voter
A swing state voter in Colorado will

Editor’s note: Alison Sorkin is a registered Republican who practices law in Denver, Colorado. She voted for John McCain in 2008 and is voting for Mitt Romney in this election.

HLN: Are you getting bombarded with political ads on TV, radio or via mail -- and if so, how do you deal with it?
Alison Sorkin: I have noticed many more ads than normal. Colorado is used to being around politics — the Democratic National Convention was held here four years ago, so it’s something we’ve been exposed to before. But this — I’ve never seen the candidates visit so much. I see ads constantly. I get the occasional phone calls but not too many mailers. But they’re always on the news because someone is always visiting. We have 9 electoral votes — it’s a change for us to have so many visitors.

HLN: How are people talking about politics right now: Is it dominating the conversations or do people try to avoid it?
AS: Once you vote, you don’t really have to pay attention anymore. It’s all about getting your vote. I voted earlier than I normally would have (we’re allowed to mail in our ballots), so I could make this decision and be done with it. It’s something we’re all aware of and people do talk about it, but not at work. It’s not that we’re tired of it, but that we’re ready for the election to come and go. Among my friends, we talk about it to some extent. We talk about how candidates don’t seem so different on a lot of issues, how they’ve positioned themselves in ads and how we’re voting on social and fiscal issues.

HLN: What are the issues that are most important to your state?
AS: Fiscal issues are really big. Economy in Colorado has suffered, and those of us in Denver are especially aware. Among my generation (I’m 29), I think social issues are more important that I thought they’d be. With women’s rights and health care, it’s become so real because people are seeing the difference when they go to the pharmacy and pick up their birth control. Actually seeing the president affect a social issue like that has made it more real and not just a topic of the election.

HLN: Do you think this last-minute, frantic campaigning will change people’s vote?
AS: I don’t think so, but we’ve been looking at how Obama’s dealing with Superstorm Sandy. So it’s not the ads or the visits that will change undecided voters, but how the president is dealing with a natural disaster. No one could have seen this — what are the chances it would happen a week from election? But it is an opportunity for leadership — if people are undecided and one of the factors is the quality of leadership and they think Obama is doing a job, that’s a valid consideration. 

HLN: Do you feel your vote is more important than that of many other Americans? What is it like to know that your vote carries more weight?
AS: Absolutely. I think people I’ve spoken to are thinking about their vote more, knowing it could be more impactful. These nine votes could make a big difference. It’s a heavy responsibility to know that the next president could be decided, based upon what Coloradoans think. We’ve never had that before. It’s a big responsibility and has made me think more about my vote. 

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