Here's looking @ you, kid

NEED TO KNOW
  • 3-D printed fetus: Awww! Or ewww?
  • Replica of mother's womb, contents made using 3-D printer
  • See how it's made
Here's looking @ you, kid

Baby books and burp cloths may come and go, but a 3-D printed model of your unborn child is forever.

Yes, the quest for the perfect new baby keepsake is officially over -- as long as you feel a 3D ultrasound still isn't quite real enough and you're cool with an exact copy of your fetus staring back at you from inside a clear replica of your uterus.

This, um, niche gift comes courtesy of a Japanese tech company called Fasotec. Working with a Tokyo clinic, they take MRI ultrasound results and run them through a 3-D printer (see how it works in video below). The data is then used to produce a white resin replica of the fetus and a clear resin replica of the mother's womb. 

More amazing things from 3-D printers: Food, digital cassette tapes and arm braces that helped heal a little girl

At $1,280 a pop, the price for this tiny treasure runs higher than most cribs. Or three cribs. But it does come in a delicate little jewelry box, so that's nice. 

And can you really put a price on the feeling of showing off your 3-D printed fetus to your friends who have nothing with which to commemorate their pregnancy except some maternity pants and photos of themselves clutching their bellies?

No. Because while baby books and burp cloths may come and go, totally one-upping your friends is also forever.

Follow Jonathan on Twitter @JonFromHLN

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